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Alfamale
08-25-2009, 12:09 AM
me, i'm currently reading "The Wolf Of Wall Street". Martin Scorcese is in the process of adapting it into a movie for release in 2010.

it's the true life story of a wall streeter that made his forture in the stock market in his early 20's. he was in jail by his 30th birthday. i'm only about half way through it, but it's a pretty good read... once i was able to put aside my annoyance of his constant references to his lavish lifestyle.

guy is a total homo at heart.

also, i just finished "Confessions Of An Economic Hitman", which was fantastic. although i was slightly annoyed in padding to pockets of a man who has caused unfathomable amounts of suffering, worldwide.

Metalleaf
08-25-2009, 12:10 AM
Archie....I can't believe he's getting married, WTF?!

Metalleaf
08-25-2009, 12:11 AM
In seriousness, I'm going through Bret Hart's autobiography....interesting stuff.

mbow30
08-25-2009, 12:22 AM
i just finished i am charlotte simmons by tom wolfe. i was a little disappointed. i enjoyed his thoroughness (descriptively) and thought some of the characters were excellent and very compelling. but i also thought that one of the main characters could easily have been written out (he was just an irritating, boring character), at times he tried to force dialogues and certain contemporary 'lingo', the main character was too naive and the ending was a bit weak.

but i like his style, and enjoy his prose so it was still worth reading.

i've also been chipping away at war and peace over the past few weeks, just because i own it and might as well read it. i'm going to take my time with it. the language is much too dense for me to read as quickly as i would any other book.

last night i read the first few stories in werewolves of their youths, a collection of short stories by chabon. he is a very, very good writer, although i think i enjoy his novels more than his shorts.

also working my way through a trading nation by michael hart and bill dymond.

hockeylover
08-25-2009, 12:30 AM
I just picked up this book that they're making a new TV series out of... FlashForward by Robert Sawyer. Haven't started yet though.

MindzEye
08-25-2009, 01:45 AM
I have about a dozen books on the spanish language that I'm digging into to improve for another jaunt down to Mehico in November.

As for real literature, I just got "Democracy in America" by De Tocqueville that I'll be getting into next week.

TheCountofMonteCristo
08-25-2009, 02:49 AM
The Plantation by Chris Kuzneski about a bunch of black guys trying to obtain justice for slavery by enslaving whites.

Factinista
08-25-2009, 10:36 AM
I'm just finishing up McLuhan's Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. Pretty mind blowing stuff, though I can't help but feel that the book assumes quite a bit of prior knowledge which I don't yet have. Even still, I really liked it and was able to grasp most of it (I think) and plan on going back to it sometime. WE ARE WHAT WE BEHOLD!

I've also got a bunch of others on the go: Camus' The Plague, Sartre's Nausea, Gladwell's Tipping Point, and Jung's Man and His Symbols (I have ADD, and you gotta balance out the existentialist stuff with something a little less gloomy).

Although I'm only 100 pages in, I'm really digging Man and His Symbols. His ideas just ring a whole lot truer than his mentor Freud's.

Oh, and a few months ago, after about a year of reading it on and off, I finally finished the batshit House of Leaves. I'm not really positive what it was all about, but the good news is nobody else does either. I've got my own ideas about, but I think it's meant to be like rorshach test of sorts. Very creepy.

blaghaus
08-25-2009, 11:15 AM
Just finished War and Peace in what must be a record 4 days. Very good read, though it isn't as good as Anna Karenina.

zeke
08-25-2009, 11:38 AM
did you really just call W&P a good read?

I love to read, and that thing was pure torture. One of the only books ever that I've given up on without finishing.

blaghaus
08-25-2009, 11:53 AM
did you really just call W&P a good read?

I love to read, and that thing was pure torture. One of the only books ever that I've given up on without finishing.

Yeah I thought it was great. Tolstoy is the perfect writer to my tastes. Dry, observant prose style. Hardly a single metaphor or simile in it. That's how I like it. I'm the kind of guy who will read Anna Karenina 4 times in a year, so there's that.

I'm trying to read Moby Dick and its flowery prose is just annoying.

TheCountofMonteCristo
08-25-2009, 02:15 PM
4 days to get through War and Peace? Holy crap.

I'm afraid even to start it.

You should read Name of the Rose.

JaysCyYoung
08-25-2009, 02:19 PM
I finished The House of the Dead by Dostoyevsky about two months ago. Easily one of the most difficult but rewarding reads that I have ever had.

blaghaus
08-25-2009, 03:55 PM
4 days to get through War and Peace? Holy crap.

I'm afraid even to start it.

You should read Name of the Rose.

It was a breeze really. I didn't find it a difficult text at all. It's paced fairly quick, as opposed to something like Camus' The Plague, which I just can't get through. Horses for courses.

I've read Focault's Pendulum, and I found that tough going.

Factinista
08-25-2009, 04:02 PM
The Plague is definitely a little on the slow-going side, which is probably why I dropped it a while ago. And the entire thing is one giant metaphor, which I'm sure you loved.

axlsalinger
08-25-2009, 08:59 PM
Just read Larry King's bio, My Remarkable Journey. It's worth a read, guy's had a pretty interesting life, some good stories in there. Have also been reading a book called Fletch Forever, which includes the first 3 Fletch books. They're all pretty entertaining reads, especially the second one (Confess, Fletch).

Montana
08-25-2009, 10:20 PM
Yeah I thought it was great. Tolstoy is the perfect writer to my tastes. Dry, observant prose style. Hardly a single metaphor or simile in it. That's how I like it. I'm the kind of guy who will read Anna Karenina 4 times in a year, so there's that.

I'm trying to read Moby Dick and its flowery prose is just annoying.

Loved 'Anna Karenina'........long read, but well worth it, one of my favorites.

Read it back-to-back with 'Don Quixote' which also ended up being a personal favorite.



I've read Focault's Pendulum, and I found that tough going.

I bought 'Foucault's Pendulum' but just haven't been able to pick it up and start it yet, knowing the tough journey it's going to be to make it through that. Something I want to knock off my list though, before too too long.

blaghaus
08-25-2009, 10:23 PM
Loved 'Anna Karenina'........long read, but well worth it, one of my favorites.

Read it back-to-back with 'Don Quixote' which also ended up being a personal favorite.




I bought 'Foucault's Pendulum' but just haven't been able to pick it up and start it yet, knowing the tough journey it's going to be to make it through that. Something I want to knock off my list though, before too too long.

Reading Foucault's Pendulum reminds of having nothing to do in North York. One of my abiding Toronto memories.

Karenina is the greatest novel ever. I don't even care about subjectivity, it just is. I'm giving myself a couple of months before I read it again. Which will be the fifth time in the last 15 months.

Montana
08-25-2009, 10:45 PM
Reading Foucault's Pendulum reminds of having nothing to do in North York. One of my abiding Toronto memories.

It's the only book I've owned, that I've ever been scared to start....:lol




Karenina is the greatest novel ever. I don't even care about subjectivity, it just is. I'm giving myself a couple of months before I read it again. Which will be the fifth time in the last 15 months.

Although it's highly regarded (obviously).........I agree that it doesn't get the credit it deserves.

Might have to take it off the shelf, and read it again actually......it's been a few years now since the last time I read it.

blaghaus
08-25-2009, 11:00 PM
It's the only book I've owned, that I've ever been scared to start....:lol

Although it's highly regarded (obviously).........I agree that it doesn't get the credit it deserves.

Might have to take it off the shelf, and read it again actually......it's been a few years now since the last time I read it.


Dostoevsky next for me, The Brothers Karamazov.

Alfamale
08-26-2009, 02:32 AM
so, i just went crazy and ordered a shitload of books off amazon.

1984, Legacy of Ashes: History of the CIA, Oil!, Politics (aristotle), The Republic (plato), Beyond Good & Evil (neitzche), and The Art Of War.

giggity goo. that's a lot of knowledge/entertainment right there for about $60.

kyle16
08-26-2009, 03:34 AM
Haha, awesome guys. You know, we should start a book club. We should have weekly discussions on a given book. Lets start with September and we should all read _______. (Ok, I was halfway kidding, but I am being halfway serious.)

I do a lot of pick up and read for a while, then put down for a bit cycle through books.

My current selection

-House of Leaves by Mark Danielwski (been reading this one off and on for a long while now)
-The Art of Start by Guy Kawasaki
-Avalanche Handbook
-Philosophy and Beer (my bathroom reader)

runninglow
08-26-2009, 06:47 AM
Just finishing Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance, an excellent story on the interactions of 4 people, and the subtle positives and dark negatives of life in an exceeding corrupt 1970's India. Would recommend to anyone. Looking forward to something a little lighter, so either Heinlein's Starship Troopers (far better than that poor excuse for a movie), or Heller's Catch 22.

Alfamale
08-27-2009, 06:25 PM
can anyone recommend a good book on the great depression?

also, i'm looking for a book on the origins of the NYSE. any ideas?

BeLeafer
08-31-2009, 08:40 PM
Check out Studs Terkel's Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression - a very interesting read based on interviews with a wide range of people who lived through it.

Montana
08-31-2009, 08:58 PM
http://bluemoviereviews.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/dunces.jpg



A Confederacy of Dunces is a picaresque novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the author's suicide. The book was published through the efforts of writer Walker Percy (who also contributed a revealing foreword) and Toole's mother Thelma Toole, quickly becoming a cult classic, and later a mainstream success. Toole posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. It is an important part of the 'modern canon' of Southern literature.[citation needed]
The title derives from the epigraph by Jonathan Swift: "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." (Thoughts on Various Subjects, Moral and Diverting)
The story is set in New Orleans in the early 1960s. The central character is Ignatius J. Reilly, an educated but slothful man still living with his mother at age 30 in the city's Uptown neighborhood, who, due to an incident early in the book, must set out to get a job. In his quest for employment he has various adventures with colorful French Quarter characters.



Reading it for a second time right now..........fantastic book.

Factinista
08-31-2009, 09:04 PM
“Oh, Fortuna, you degenerate wanton!”

PlayerToBeNamedLater
08-31-2009, 09:20 PM
Fahrenheit 451

Awesome stuff

Jeremy
08-31-2009, 09:36 PM
Learning to Sing, by Clay Aiken. Just about to start it.

SundinsTooth
09-01-2009, 08:12 AM
Reading it for a second time right now..........fantastic book.

This book made me the hot-dog salesman I am today.....

I am reading some fantasy right now -


The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch

Very fun caper style book....light on fantasy but heavy on the capers. Damn enjoyable.

Alfamale
09-01-2009, 02:19 PM
Check out Studs Terkel's Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression - a very interesting read based on interviews with a wide range of people who lived through it.thx dude.

BG
09-01-2009, 04:05 PM
Working through a couple of Wealth Management texts, but also in the middle of Fooled by Randomness - Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Sway - Ori and Rom Brafman.

I'm really digging the sudden surge in material about probability, risk and their relationship to human nature.

axlsalinger
09-01-2009, 04:23 PM
A Confederacy of Dunces written by John Kennedy Toole

The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch Both of these sound interesting, will check 'em out.

If anyone's interested in some good science-fiction, I HIGHLY recommend the following. The first one's more serious, literary, with great characters. The second one's just a helluva lot of fun.

- The Sparrow (written by Mary Doria Russell) - along with its equally good sequel, Children of God.

- Newton's Wake: A Space Opera (written by Ken MacLeod)

SundinsTooth
09-01-2009, 06:09 PM
Both of these sound interesting, will check 'em out.

If anyone's interested in some good science-fiction, I HIGHLY recommend the following. The first one's more serious, literary, with great characters. The second one's just a helluva lot of fun.

- The Sparrow (written by Mary Doria Russell) - along with its equally good sequel, Children of God.

- Newton's Wake: A Space Opera (written by Ken MacLeod)

Gonna hit the bookstore tonight - will check both of these out!

SundinsTooth
09-09-2009, 09:03 PM
Both of these sound interesting, will check 'em out.

If anyone's interested in some good science-fiction, I HIGHLY recommend the following. The first one's more serious, literary, with great characters. The second one's just a helluva lot of fun.

- The Sparrow (written by Mary Doria Russell) - along with its equally good sequel, Children of God.

- Newton's Wake: A Space Opera (written by Ken MacLeod)

Had a hard time finding these two books but they came today courtesy of Amazon.ca. They both sound very good and right up my alley!

I just have a few hundred pages left in Red Seas Under Red Skies and then I will delve into Newton's Wake.

axlsalinger
09-09-2009, 10:06 PM
Had a hard time finding these two books but they came today courtesy of Amazon.ca. They both sound very good and right up my alley!

I just have a few hundred pages left in Red Seas Under Red Skies and then I will delve into Newton's Wake.Cool, hope you like 'em. If you enjoy The Sparrow, be sure to read the sequel Children of God.

Was looking for some sci-fi over the past few days, totally forgot about the suggestion here (The Lies of Locke Lamora) but I will check it out. I did pick up Philip K. Dick's The Man in the High Castle and Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon. Ordered a few from Amazon late Monday night, and the package already arrived today.

By the way, I love what I have read from this list so far, so will continue to go through them:

http://io9.com/361597/the-twenty-science-fiction-novels-that-will-change-your-life

blaghaus
09-09-2009, 10:08 PM
I'm going to start a MA in English in 2010, so I've bought some of the books I'll be studying. Antigone by Sophocles, and the version by Jean Anouilh. Yawn. While I'm waiting for those to arrive, I'm reading The Three Musketeers.

SundinsTooth
09-10-2009, 08:47 AM
I'm going to start a MA in English in 2010, so I've bought some of the books I'll be studying. Antigone by Sophocles, and the version by Jean Anouilh. Yawn. While I'm waiting for those to arrive, I'm reading The Three Musketeers.

Good luck! Where are you studying?

blaghaus
09-10-2009, 09:12 AM
Good luck! Where are you studying?

Open University. The distance learning Uni. Really good rep. I'd prefer to go to a uni, but it's not possible with work.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_University

SundinsTooth
09-10-2009, 09:44 AM
Open University. The distance learning Uni. Really good rep. I'd prefer to go to a uni, but it's not possible with work.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_University

I hear ya. I got fired last year from my company and am full of free time....so I was able to enroll full time at Waterloo.....it is actually the best thing that has ever happened to me (getting laid off) as it finally took away any excuses to not go for a degree.

I have heard great things from that Open Uni.

blaghaus
09-10-2009, 09:55 AM
I hear ya. I got fired last year from my company and am full of free time....so I was able to enroll full time at Waterloo.....it is actually the best thing that has ever happened to me (getting laid off) as it finally took away any excuses to not go for a degree.

I have heard great things from that Open Uni.

Cool, I've heard good things about Waterloo.

Eventually I'd like to do a Phd, you never know, I might try and do it in Canada. Some really good schools over there.

Alfamale
09-15-2009, 11:54 PM
i'm about halfway through, "The Ice Man - Confessions Of A Mafia Contract Killer".

it's the true story of a Richard "The Ice Man" Kuklinski, a tormented soul who endured a dreadfully violent and fearful childhood. one which would see his older brother beaten to death by his father during one bouts of rage. when all was said and done, Kuklinski had murdered hundreds of people for either himself, the 7 major mafia families, or anyone else who was ready to pony up the coin.

whenever he wasn't killing people, or beating down his wife, he'd toss barbeque's in which all his neighbours were invidted. it's a pretty gruesome read, as one might imagine. for example, when someone tries to steal from him, he uses a flare to burn a guys genitals off.

also just starting on "Hitler's Scientists - Science, War, & The Devil's Pact".

Metalleaf
09-15-2009, 11:54 PM
Sun Tzu's The Art of War

hockeylover
09-16-2009, 12:03 AM
I hear ya. I got fired last year from my company and am full of free time....so I was able to enroll full time at Waterloo.....it is actually the best thing that has ever happened to me (getting laid off) as it finally took away any excuses to not go for a degree.

I have heard great things from that Open Uni.

I just started at UOIT. Going well so far but I feel kinda old with all of these 18 year olds running around.

Metalleaf
09-16-2009, 12:14 AM
If they step out of line, just pwn them with your wisdom

BeLeafer
09-16-2009, 12:20 AM
Recasting Bourgeois Europe - Stabilization in France, Germany and Italy in the Decade After World War I by Charles Maier

The book examines the emergence of corporatism focusing on the continuity through extreme upheaval; how the established classes maintained their position and the basic structure of society over the ten years following the war.

BeLeafer
09-16-2009, 12:44 AM
Oh, and for my pals over in the Obama thread, I have on order ...

Wings of Judgment - American Bombing in WWII by Ronald Schaffer.

teeds
09-16-2009, 05:42 AM
Looking forward to seeing you BL, looks like you are reading some good stuff.

And I want to reveal to you my discovery of four months ago. The definitive elephant foot of the elites investment direction. Fluke discovery. Told me every sectors explosion up or down since. Gold and natural gas being the latest. Its a shocker.

BeLeafer
09-16-2009, 05:58 AM
I'm curious.

Factinista
09-16-2009, 11:24 AM
I just started at UOIT. Going well so far but I feel kinda old with all of these 18 year olds running around.

Yeah I'm in the same boat at Carleton. It wasn't so bad in the summer where I was probably middle of the pack age-wise, but the guy sitting beside me yesterday had braces.

PS say hi to my buddy Dave for me.

mbow30
09-16-2009, 11:59 AM
Yeah I'm in the same boat at Carleton. It wasn't so bad in the summer where I was probably middle of the pack age-wise, but the guy sitting beside me yesterday had braces.

PS say hi to my buddy Dave for me.

**** Dave and **** you too, for that matter.

Factinista
09-16-2009, 12:03 PM
Hey man, say what you will about me, but leave Dave outta this.

JaysCyYoung
09-16-2009, 12:04 PM
I'm reading Passport Canada's renewal form and the rage is steadily building within me.

sun face
09-16-2009, 12:30 PM
I'm surprised no one is reading the Leafs AbomiNATION book! I picked it up from Costco the other day for 2/3 of the price or whatever. It's a fast read but is basically a regurgitation of everything negative that you hear over and over again from people about the Leafs. The book makes me sad that the authors cover the Leafs - they seem to hate the team, so by extension must hate their lives.

I recently finished the first Dexter book. The first 2/3 of it was enjoyable but it fell apart at the end. The show is a lot better.

I'm about to read the Motley Crue autobiography. It's my girlfriend's favourite book, so I'm pretty psyched.

SundinsTooth
09-16-2009, 07:54 PM
I just started at UOIT. Going well so far but I feel kinda old with all of these 18 year olds running around.

Yeah, my first week has been full of lots of sirs....lol. Chemistry is going to kill me.

hockeylover
09-16-2009, 10:17 PM
I finally found a guy in my lecture the other day who looked old enough that he might possibly remember the last time the Jays won the World Series.

Progress.

Metalleaf
09-16-2009, 10:20 PM
I'm reading Passport Canada's renewal form and the rage is steadily building within me.

You know this is ****, when getting a British passport is easier than obtaining a Canadian one.

SundinsTooth
09-16-2009, 10:26 PM
I finally found a guy in my lecture the other day who looked old enough that he might possibly remember the last time the Jays won the World Series.

Progress.

I can't find anyone that remembers a dollar bill for eff's sakes.

BeLeafer
09-16-2009, 10:51 PM
I do!

GGpX
09-16-2009, 11:04 PM
I've been reading Lord of the Flies by William Golding.

Can't believe it's been nearly a decade since I first read it.

SundinsTooth
09-16-2009, 11:19 PM
I do!


1987....last dollar bill. Ahh.

Metalleaf
09-16-2009, 11:27 PM
I remember the $2 bill...

BeLeafer
09-16-2009, 11:31 PM
1987....last dollar bill. Ahh.

I was a bartender in those days.

Cheapie: 'Keep the change.'

Bonanza!

SundinsTooth
09-16-2009, 11:34 PM
http://www.filibustercartoons.com/New%20Canada%20Guide/content/money/bill.jpg

MindzEye
09-17-2009, 02:33 AM
Hot, Flat, & Crowded by Thomas Friedman

Montana
09-17-2009, 03:13 AM
http://larryfire.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/cross.jpg

One of my favorite comedians over the last 15 years.......and so far, the books as funny as everything else he's done.

axlsalinger
09-17-2009, 06:56 PM
Heh. David Cross is hilarious, saw him promoting the book on the Daily Show a while back. It's on my list.

Alfamale
10-10-2009, 02:01 PM
"The Inquisition"

the Catholic religion has such a wonderful history.

axlsalinger
10-10-2009, 02:45 PM
YouTube - The Spanish Inquisition!

jrsuperstar
10-10-2009, 03:10 PM
Was lese ich heute?

Rudi Dutschke::Wir hatten ein barbarisches, schönes Leben von Gretchen Dutschke.

und auch auf Deutsche "Fight Club" von Chuck Palahniuk (übersetzt von Fred Kinsel)

MindzEye
10-10-2009, 04:11 PM
out of curiousity...why would you post entirely in german? I'm pretty sure you're the only german speaker on the board.

BeLeafer
10-10-2009, 04:35 PM
Vietnam: The History of an Unwinnable War, 1945-1975
by John Pardos

This is probably the best book on the Vietnam War since Gabriel Kolko's Anatomy of a War.

Alfamale
10-11-2009, 10:43 PM
i'm curious about the origins of the stock market. anybody got any suggestions?

lecoqsportif
10-12-2009, 12:24 AM
i'm curious about the origins of the stock market. anybody got any suggestions?

Can't make any recommendations, but here's the first book that pops up on a quick search: Amazon.com: A History of the Global Stock Market: From Ancient Rome to Silicon Valley (9780226764047): B. Mark Smith: Books

Currently reading The Mystery of Capital by Hernando de Soto: Amazon.com: The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else (9780465016143): Hernando De Soto: Books

trujaysfan
10-12-2009, 01:12 AM
i'm curious about the origins of the stock market. anybody got any suggestions?

focus on the market not the company. Look globally and focus on differentiation instead of company

mbow30
10-12-2009, 01:27 AM
Starting to catch up on my Canadian history--reading My Times by Pierre Berton and I've caught his Canadiana bug so up next is The National Dream and The Last Spike.

Alfamale
10-23-2009, 03:02 PM
Failed States - Noam Chomsky

mbow30
10-23-2009, 03:53 PM
Failed States - Noam Chomsky

While I wouldn't dare question is intellect, this book doesn't offer very much, IMO. It's just typical Chomsky: a somewhat paranoid world view, anti-US rhetoric and decontextualization of events by looking at every incident in a vacuum. I think his general line of inquiry is well intentioned and necessary, but this book just regurgitates a lot of what he has been arguing for forty years.

But if this look at history (particularly US history) interests you then I highly recommend Grandin's Empire's Workshop. It is published by the same company and as part of the same project (if memory serves correct they're calling it the 'Empire Project.')

I don't necessarily agree with Grandin's main premise in the book, but he subjects his analysis to a rigorous historiography, which makes the evidence in support of some of his claims mostly irrefutable.

mbow30
10-23-2009, 03:54 PM
as for my current reads: the desperate people (mowatt) and oh canada! oh quebec (richler) so i'm still on my canadiana binge.

Alfamale
10-24-2009, 07:56 PM
thx mbow. this is my first chomsky book, though, so i think i'll read er through. i like his writing style so far.

Alfamale
11-16-2009, 07:16 PM
what are your favorite topics to read/learn about?

SundinsTooth
11-16-2009, 08:04 PM
Just working on some fun reading so I picked up Stephen King's new one - Under the Dome. If you like his epic novels then I think this one will be enjoyable for you. Such a hokey idea but he really sells it here, and it works! A small town cut off from the world by an unexplained force field. The inhabitants quickly spiral into camps as the survival instincts kick in. Fun stuff.

MindzEye
11-16-2009, 08:08 PM
what are your favorite topics to read/learn about?

Mainly politics/economic/foreign policy, health, & languages...with a little bit of particle physics thrown in when I feel like breaking my brain.

TimHorton
11-16-2009, 08:09 PM
Just finishing up Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers and then John Keegan has a new book on the American Civil War I'm giddy about.

TheCountofMonteCristo
11-16-2009, 08:10 PM
A book on KB sexploits in Thailand called "I like em young"

:couch

TheCountofMonteCristo
11-16-2009, 08:11 PM
Just finishing up Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers and then John Keegan has a new book on the American Civil War I'm giddy about.

What's the name of Keegan's book? I like his books on WWII etc

I really liked the Outliers. Explained to me why I didn't make the NHL, I was born in July, not my fault ;)

TimHorton
11-16-2009, 08:32 PM
http://www.amazon.com/American-Civil-War-Military-History/dp/0307263436

That's Keegan's book, and Outliers is amazing. I think I'll pick up Blink next as I've heard good things about it.

TheCountofMonteCristo
11-16-2009, 08:37 PM
The reviews were pretty scathing

blaghaus
11-16-2009, 08:39 PM
I didn't care much for Outliers. Gladwell's shtick wears thin with me. Take two utterly different subjects and link them in some wildly esoteric way. I'll credit his writing skills that he doesn't make that completely obvious all the time, but it's comparing apples and oranges most of the time. Outlier's was basically a 5000 word article spread over a couple hundred pages.

TimHorton
11-16-2009, 08:39 PM
I've never been one for reviews.....good or bad. And every Keegan book I've read I've enjoyed, so that works for me.

TheCountofMonteCristo
11-16-2009, 08:44 PM
I loved the one who yapped about factual error saying Winfield Scott was 85 at the start of the war when he was 75. I'm thinking hello, it's a typo, not a factual error.

TimHorton
11-16-2009, 08:45 PM
I think I've read almost all of Keegan's books and never thought man, what a waste. Plus you know how wrapped up the Yanks get in the Civil War, especially when you have an outsider writing about it. My money is on the book being quite good.

TheCountofMonteCristo
11-16-2009, 08:49 PM
I know what you mean. A sure fire way to stir the pot with Americans is to tell them the truth, namely that ultimately their civil war was about slavery. You then get all the states' rights, war of northern agression types out in full force, it is a sight to see.

TimHorton
11-16-2009, 08:52 PM
Its so easy to wind them up about it. And so its not a suprise that an outsider (with insane credentials) writing about it has them all uppity.

Bunch of slave merchants.

corksens
11-17-2009, 11:53 AM
The Tipping Point - Malcolm Gladwell.

LeafHound69
11-17-2009, 11:05 PM
Just about finished re-reading the Richard Sharp series by Cornwell.

And before that, O'brien's Jack Aubrey series.

Historical fun!

Alfamale
11-22-2009, 09:26 PM
just opened up 2 new books today:

Young Stalin and Nazi Germany & the Jews

Montana
11-23-2009, 01:17 AM
What the Dog Saw - Malcolm Gladwell.

Alfamale
12-27-2009, 01:53 AM
currently reading a couple:

Consumed - how markets corrupt children, infantilize adults, and swallow citizens whole.

Beyond Band Of Brothers - Major Dick Winters true life accounts of the training leading up to, and the times he spend leading his troops through WW2.

can't wait to go book pillaging tomorrow with my xmas gift cards!

Habsy
12-27-2009, 02:01 AM
The Health Care Bill - Multiple Authors

Alfamale
01-05-2010, 04:20 PM
just opened:

Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler, and Generation Kill (from which the mini-series was created)

jrsuperstar
01-05-2010, 04:46 PM
Has anyone had any experience with the Kindle or other E-Book readers? From what I have seen there really isn't many books available here in Canada? Why is that? Why can't I just buy what I want to buy? Also, I do not understand why an E-Book doesn't cost less than a real book, how can that be?

zeke
01-05-2010, 04:49 PM
Kindle actually works surprisingly well, but yeah you can't use it in Canada, although I think it's coming soon.

zeke
01-05-2010, 04:50 PM
I just ripped through SuperFreakenomics - which was SuperFreaking awesome.

Love their approach to analyzing issues, and just rammed full of fascinating information.

Highly recommended.

Montana
01-05-2010, 04:52 PM
I just bought Freakenomics + SuperFreakenomics yesterday...........had a $100 gift card for Amazon to run through, so ordered a number of books...been watching those guys for ages, but had never got around to actually picking up their books till now.

zeke
01-05-2010, 04:56 PM
Yeah, always wanted to read them, but never got around to reading it until someone gave me one for xmas.

PQ
01-05-2010, 04:57 PM
there's a kindle global or something like that that you can order from amazon and it's made for Canada among other countries.

i use an "Astak Mentor". it's not as well-known as sony, kindle or the barnes & noble alternative, but it supports pdf, doc and txt as well as the much needed arabic language.. pretty cheap compared to others too

Montana
01-05-2010, 05:03 PM
Yeah, always wanted to read them, but never got around to reading it until someone gave me one for xmas.


If you haven't seen them, both Levitt and Dubner have had some great interviews on "Charlie Rose"......think their still available online, via the PBS website, if you ever wanted to check them out.




When I grabbed those two books, I also ordered.....


http://bestlittlebookshelf.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/outliers3.jpg

Outliers: The Story of Success

Now that he's gotten us talking about the viral life of ideas and the power of gut reactions, Malcolm Gladwell poses a more provocative question in Outliers: why do some people succeed, living remarkably productive and impactful lives, while so many more never reach their potential? Challenging our cherished belief of the "self-made man," he makes the democratic assertion that superstars don't arise out of nowhere, propelled by genius and talent: "they are invariably the beneficiaries of hidden advantages and extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies that allow them to learn and work hard and make sense of the world in ways others cannot." Examining the lives of outliers from Mozart to Bill Gates, he builds a convincing case for how successful people rise on a tide of advantages, "some deserved, some not, some earned, some just plain lucky."







http://images.mailermailer.com/image/6727902a/19805/chronic_city.jpg

Chronic City

Jonathan Lethem, the home-grown frontrunner of a generation of Brooklyn writers, crosses the bridge to Manhattan in Chronic City, a smart, unsettling, and meticulously hilarious novel of friendship and real estate among the rich and the rent-controlled. Lethem's story centers around two unlikely friends, Chase Insteadman, a genial nonentity who was once a child sitcom star and now is best known as the loyal fiancé of a space-stranded astronaut, and Perkus Tooth, a skinny, moody, underemployed cultural critic. Chase and Perkus are free-floating, dope-dependent bohemians in a borough built on ambition, living on its margins but with surprising access to its centers of power, even to the city's billionaire mayor. Paranoiac Perkus sees urgent plots everywhere--in the font of The New Yorker, in an old VHS copy of Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid--but Chronic City, despite the presence of death, politics, and a mysterious, marauding tiger, is itself light on plot. Eschewing dramatic staples like romance and artistic creation for the more meandering passions of friendship and observation, Chronic City thrives instead on the brilliance of Lethem's ear and eye. Every page is a pleasure of pitch-perfect banter and spot-on cultural satire, cut sharply with the melancholic sense that being able to explain your city doesn't make you any more capable of living in it.






http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41cM%2BPdQq4L._SS500_.jpg

Charlie Kaufman and Hollywood's Merry Band of Pranksters, Fabulists and Dreamers: An Excursion Into the American New Wave

Since the late 1990s, a subtle, subversive element has been at work within the staid confines of the Hollywood dream factory. Young filmmakers like Spike Jonze, Wes Anderson, Michel Gondry, David O. Russell, Richard Linklater, and Sofia Coppola rode in on the coattails of the independent film movement that blossomed in the early 1990s and have managed to wage an aesthetic campaign against cowardice of the imagination, much like their artistic forebears, the so-called Movie Brats—Coppola, Scorsese, De Palma, Altman, and Ashby among others—did in the 1970s. But their true pedigree can be traced back to the cinematic provocateurs of the Nouvelle Vague—such as Truffaut, Goddard, Chabrol, Rohmer, and Rivette—who, in the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s, liberated screens around the world with a series of films that challenged our assumptions of what the medium could offer and how stories could be told—all of them snapping with style as much as they delivered on ideas. Highly idiosyncratic yet intricately realized, accessible yet willing to overthrow the constraints of formal storytelling, surreal yet always grounded in human emotions, this new film movement captures the angst of its characters and the times in which we live, but with a wryness, imagination, earnestness, irony, and stylish wit that makes the slide into existential despair a little more amusing than it should be.





http://rgr-static1.tangentlabs.co.uk/images/bau/97803163/9780316346627/0/0/plain/tipping-point-how-little-things-can-make-a-big-difference.jpg

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

"The best way to understand the dramatic transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life," writes Malcolm Gladwell, "is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do." Although anyone familiar with the theory of memetics will recognize this concept, Gladwell's The Tipping Point has quite a few interesting twists on the subject.

For example, Paul Revere was able to galvanize the forces of resistance so effectively in part because he was what Gladwell calls a "Connector": he knew just about everybody, particularly the revolutionary leaders in each of the towns that he rode through. But Revere "wasn't just the man with the biggest Rolodex in colonial Boston," he was also a "Maven" who gathered extensive information about the British. He knew what was going on and he knew exactly whom to tell. The phenomenon continues to this day--think of how often you've received information in an e-mail message that had been forwarded at least half a dozen times before reaching you.

Gladwell develops these and other concepts (such as the "stickiness" of ideas or the effect of population size on information dispersal) through simple, clear explanations and entertainingly illustrative anecdotes, such as comparing the pedagogical methods of Sesame Street and Blue's Clues, or explaining why it would be even easier to play Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon with the actor Rod Steiger. Although some readers may find the transitional passages between chapters hold their hands a little too tightly, and Gladwell's closing invocation of the possibilities of social engineering sketchy, even chilling, The Tipping Point is one of the most effective books on science for a general audience in ages. It seems inevitable that "tipping point," like "future shock" or "chaos theory," will soon become one of those ideas that everybody knows--or at least knows by name.

mbow30
01-05-2010, 05:03 PM
freakonomics is great. haven't gotten around to reading super F, yet.

right now reading the proud highway.

nov was the busiest month of my life and left me mentally exhausted, so i took basically all of december off from thinking/reading.

have proud highway, last of the mohicans and flight of the creative class lined up to keep me busy for the next few weeks. waiting for chabon's new book (thx zeke) to come out in paperback (it should soon, if it hasn't already) to touch up on my contemp. lit.

mbow30
01-05-2010, 05:04 PM
outliers was enjoyable. nothing groundbreaking, but like freakonomics just an interesting read.

zeke
01-05-2010, 05:16 PM
not so good with Outliers trying to ignore the importance of talent, and reducing everything to hard work + luck.

zeke
01-05-2010, 05:16 PM
which chabon book did you read? Jews with Swords?

mbow30
01-05-2010, 05:29 PM
which chabon book did you read? Jews with Swords?

i've read cavalier and clay, policeman's union and mysteries of pittsburgh...

mbow30
01-05-2010, 05:31 PM
not so good with Outliers trying to ignore the importance of talent, and reducing everything to hard work + luck.

i think you're taking it to an illogical end. it didn't seem like gladwell argued that talent wasn't important, just that hard work + circumstance (or luck if you want to call it that) can be just as important.

though i agree he doesn't talk enough about talent, i dont' think he's trying to undermine it.

Factinista
01-05-2010, 05:42 PM
Even geniuses agree that their success is due mainly to hard work, though. I'm just finishing up one of Feynman's autobios and he said that he doesn't believe in extraordinary people, and anyone can become great after putting in the requisite years of intensely hard work. Maybe he's being humble, but I'm inclined to believe that the guy knows what he's talking about. Einstein also said something similar IIRC (the 1% inspiration, 99% perspiration thing).

That book is here (http://gorgorat.com/), btw, and it's great. What a character.

Factinista
01-05-2010, 05:46 PM
And I put a few ebooks on my iPod touch (not a kindle exactly, but kinda close) and it's weird as hell IMO. I can see the benefits, but reading 300+ pages off a screen is something I don't think I could do.

I do love that you can look up definitions on the fly, though. I hate having to put the thing down and walk over to the computer to look up what a word means.

Montana
01-05-2010, 05:55 PM
I've heard Gladwell talk about the 'talent' discussion..........and it's not that he tries to undermine it.........it's just that he doesn't find it as interesting a topic.

He uses Derrick Coleman as an example of someone who many feel was the most talented player they ever witnessed, but he didn't have everything else it takes to be great.....hard work, determination, etc etc.....

Montana
01-05-2010, 05:57 PM
And I put a few ebooks on my iPod touch (not a kindle exactly, but kinda close) and it's weird as hell IMO. I can see the benefits, but reading 300+ pages off a screen is something I don't think I could do.

I do love that you can look up definitions on the fly, though. I hate having to put the thing down and walk over to the computer to look up what a word means.

I'm the same........I used to use my Palm Pilot to read e-books, and it just wasn't a comfortable experience.

I much prefer a physically copy of the book.

Montana
01-05-2010, 05:59 PM
I've heard Gladwell talk about the 'talent' discussion..........and it's not that he tries to undermine it.........it's just that he doesn't find it as interesting a topic.

He uses Derrick Coleman as an example of someone who many feel was the most talented player they ever witnessed, but he didn't have everything else it takes to be great.....hard work, determination, etc etc.....

Found the clip I was thinking of.........again, from Charlie Rose.


YouTube- Charlie Rose - Malcolm Gladwell

SundinsTooth
01-05-2010, 06:11 PM
I bought a sony e-reader but returned it yesterday - basically bought it for school as a lot of my text books were available as pdf's but it was a bit tough to see some of the conversions. I did read some of Feynman's lecture on it and it was very nice on the eyes...and there is a torrent kicking around of 1400 of the best novels around....

Factinista
01-05-2010, 06:14 PM
Feynman is sick with it. I think the guy is my new hero. There's all kinds of great lectures and interviews with him on youtube if you're interested.

SundinsTooth
01-05-2010, 06:17 PM
Feynman is sick with it. I think the guy is my new hero. There's all kinds of great lectures and interviews with him on youtube if you're interested.

Yeah the physics department here at UW had a big week of his stuff....it was geeky but fun. My physics prof this term is a big fan and almost as entertaining....

zeke
01-05-2010, 07:24 PM
i think you're taking it to an illogical end. it didn't seem like gladwell argued that talent wasn't important, just that hard work + circumstance (or luck if you want to call it that) can be just as important.

though i agree he doesn't talk enough about talent, i dont' think he's trying to undermine it.

Oh, I absolutely think he is - and it's a nice feelgood populist sentiment that guarantees him popularity and attention.

Makes people feel good to think that they can be anythying they want to be.

jrsuperstar
01-05-2010, 09:04 PM
Oh, I absolutely think he is - and it's a nice feelgood populist sentiment that guarantees him popularity and attention.

Makes people feel good to think that they can be anythying they want to be.

A lot of points are very poignant, especially when he relates it to hockey players. I found that very interesting. I really found the bit where he co relates many of the icons of the computer age with being born in 1955, being involved in computers at an early age and being in the general vicinity of then evolving Silicone Valley. When he interviewed Jobs and Gates, the first thing they said was how lucky they were.

It is interesting how he looks at other factors than the obvious. He does not discount talent, but there are many other factors of why some people succeed and some don't.

What I do like is that he does not come across as a know it all social science major. Too many people out there that play the role of the arm chair sociologist, economist, etc...

JaysCyYoung
01-06-2010, 12:34 AM
I'm currently reading "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Joel Diamond. It basically tracks the rise of various civilizations around the world and attempts to answer why the ones that became the most technologically and culturally successful were able to do so and subjugate other less advanced civilizations (and also answer why, for instance, it was not the Incan royalty that sailed to Spain to conquer Charles I rather than vice-versa).

mbow30
01-06-2010, 01:00 AM
I'm currently reading "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Joel Diamond. It basically tracks the rise of various civilizations around the world and attempts to answer why the ones that became the most technologically and culturally successful were able to do so and subjugate other less advanced civilizations (and also answer why, for instance, it was not the Incan royalty that sailed to Spain to conquer Charles I rather than vice-versa).

great book. it gets progressively speculative as the book progresses, but it's an interesting theory which he at least has SOME scientific evidence to backup with (as you will in the first half, less so in the second).

if you enjoy it i would recommend dawkin's the selfish gene, if only because it seems that diamond found much inspiration for his own theory in dawkins'.

mbow30
01-06-2010, 01:02 AM
Oh, I absolutely think he is - and it's a nice feelgood populist sentiment that guarantees him popularity and attention.

Makes people feel good to think that they can be anythying they want to be.

you filthy pessimist.


i still disagree. i don't think he was saying that anybody can be whatever they want to be, just that our potential is often more limited by our situations than on our performance/ability level.

i.e. i could be the greatest lawn bowler in the history of the world but i don't know if i am or not because i have never lawn bowled before.

JaysCyYoung
01-06-2010, 01:19 AM
great book. it gets progressively speculative as the book progresses, but it's an interesting theory which he at least has SOME scientific evidence to backup with (as you will in the first half, less so in the second).

if you enjoy it i would recommend dawkin's the selfish gene, if only because it seems that diamond found much inspiration for his own theory in dawkins'.

That's interesting. I'm only about a quarter of the way through but I'll keep that in mind was I move through the middle and latter chapters. So far I find his theories concerning geographic location being the prime consideration for societal development a little underwhelming (there seem to be as many theories against this one as there is for), but he does bring up a lot of strong supporting evidence.

And man is it still ever incredible that 168 Spaniards brought down an empire of millions.

bayrider
01-06-2010, 01:19 AM
Reading this one right now. It makes you re-think eating out.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UjOby%2BHPL._SL500_.jpg

JaysCyYoung
01-06-2010, 01:21 AM
Yeah... I think I'd rather remain willfully ignorant of those sorts of things to be honest (ala The Matrix).

MindzEye
01-06-2010, 01:38 AM
Reading this one right now. It makes you re-think eating out.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UjOby%2BHPL._SL500_.jpg

any hi lights you'd like to share?

bayrider
01-06-2010, 02:00 AM
It's actually not that bad. It's pretty common sense, but there is A LOT that goes on in a kitchen you'd never imagine. It's a completely different world back there and the book exposes it.

Never eat brunch. Never eat seafood on Mondays or Tuesdays. Rolls are recycled every chance a restaurant can reuse them. Soups, specials are a quick way to get rid of old, unused foods that's about to go bad.

It's all about turnover. For example, if a steakhouse looks to be a little slow, don't go in there ordering the lobster or shrimp because there's a good chacne that shit has been sitting there for a while.

Oh, there's also some pretty grotesque ****ing that goes on back there.

JaysCyYoung
01-06-2010, 12:02 PM
I don't know. I worked at The Keg in the kitchen as a teenager and everything was absurdly sanitary. We had to wear hairnets and hats, use disinfectant on all of the runners and metal countertops, and had inspection over the course of the night and at the end of a shift to make sure there was no unclean areas.

bayrider
01-06-2010, 01:45 PM
I'm not talking about sanitation. The place can be spotless, the food still goes bad.

blkngldbabe
01-06-2010, 01:57 PM
A Prayer for Owen Meany ~ John Irving

corksens
01-06-2010, 02:00 PM
I'm a big magazine guy. It's an awesome Sunday afternoon w/ football read.

Men's Journal is quickly overtaking GQ...which I've found is overly pompous.

axlsalinger
01-06-2010, 02:11 PM
Big fan of Esquire magazine.

I think I mentioned this book previously, but just finished up with Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. It's phenomenal. I will be checking out several of his other novels as soon as I can.

Montana
01-06-2010, 02:14 PM
I'm still a sucker for GQ..............Then again, I enjoy being overly pompous.

Artnes
01-06-2010, 02:17 PM
I'm not talking about sanitation. The place can be spotless, the food still goes bad.

I worked at a Wendys in hs and walked in the kitchen to a guy sitring the chili with his arm elbow deep in the pot.

Not every place is squeaky clean

mbow30
01-06-2010, 02:18 PM
Not every place is squeaky clean

case in point, your mom's vagina

heyooooooooooooo

Artnes
01-06-2010, 02:21 PM
you missed me

TimHorton
01-06-2010, 02:34 PM
GQ still wins for the best overall mag.

And Arty's mom is spotless I promise you.

Montana
01-06-2010, 02:36 PM
And Arty's mom is spotless I promise you.


Not when I left she wasn`t.

mbow30
01-06-2010, 02:40 PM
GQ still wins for the best overall mag.

And Arty's mom is spotless I promise you.

seriously? you prefer GQ over BE?

http://cdn.magazines.com/fetch/key/product_black-enterprise/image?macro=medium

and Ebony?

http://cdn.magazines.com/fetch/key/product_ebony/image?macro=medium

I find that surprising.

TimHorton
01-06-2010, 02:53 PM
I'm a refined brother msun, get with the program.

http://www.celebritywonder.com/picture/Farnsworth_Bentley/FarnsworthBe_Kambouris_56704946.jpg

Leo Bannister
01-06-2010, 03:04 PM
Got this for Christmas.....

http://www.audioeditions.com/audio-book-images/Band-of-Brothers-E4P788L.jpg

It's so ****ing good. Started on Monday having a hard time putting it down.

Alfamale
01-26-2010, 10:53 AM
^^^^^^^^

how's the book coming along, Leo?

Alfamale
01-26-2010, 10:54 AM
Opening Shutter Island, and Blackwater (the worlds most powerful merc army) today.

PQ
01-26-2010, 01:20 PM
how do you read several books at the same time?

I started Freakonomics thanks to this thread

mbow30
01-27-2010, 02:31 AM
just started Lie Down in Darkness by William Styron.

so far, so good.

axlsalinger
01-27-2010, 01:52 PM
Reading The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick. An alternate reality where Japan and Germany won WW2 and took over the world. Written in 1962, it's really, really good so far.

zeke
01-27-2010, 03:04 PM
Dick is good. (quote it).

Blade Runner was on the other night - read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? if you haven't already, it adds interesting depth to the flick (even though the flick definitely stands on its own).

axlsalinger
01-27-2010, 03:08 PM
Been meaning to read that book for years, was going to buy it a few weeks ago but got this one instead. Coincidentally, just picked up a used copy of Bladerunner Director's Cut on DVD a couple of days ago for $4. I've seen the movie a few times, but not for years so I'm looking forward to watching it again soon.

zeke
01-27-2010, 03:48 PM
Director's Cut or Final Cut?

axlsalinger
01-27-2010, 03:52 PM
It's the Director's Cut version (original cut).

zeke
01-27-2010, 04:01 PM
might want to get your hands on the Final Cut.

SundinsTooth
01-27-2010, 04:24 PM
Darwin's "Origin of Species" and just read E=MC2 which was a nice breezy read on Einsteins equation....

mbow30
01-27-2010, 04:45 PM
might want to get your hands on the Final Cut.

nono, pretty sure the directors cut is what you want -- if i recall correctly scott didn't like the final cut because of the shortening/cut job, and the fact that they inserted a voice over to try and do away with some of the films ambiguities.

the directors cut is the better one.

zeke
01-27-2010, 05:02 PM
actually, there was a Director's Cut (which is the one I think Axl has - the original cut), which was unauthorized and Ridley hated.

Then there was an authorized Director's Cut which he made right after that which was a bit better.

that was back in the early 90s.

but just a few years ago, he came out with the Final Cut, which is by far the best of them. that's the one you want.

Montana
01-27-2010, 05:10 PM
Freakonomics is every bit as brilliant as I expected it to be......I wish Levitt worked for the Leafs.

axlsalinger
01-28-2010, 05:30 PM
My favourite author J.D. Salinger died yesterday at the age of 91. It's a sad day.

Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey, Nine Stories. All MUST reads.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/28/j-d-salinger-dead-catcher_n_440500.html

He reportedly told somebody that he had continued writing novels all along, and that they would (or at least, might) be released after his death. The article quotes a former neighbour who said in 1999 that Salinger told him he'd completed at least 15 novels years earlier.

His last published work was the short story Hapworth 16, 1928, which appeared in New Yorker magazine in 1965. Will be interested to see what, if anything, happens next.

R.I.P. J.D. Salinger.

Montana
01-28-2010, 05:57 PM
I hope the long standing rumors of is unpublished novels are true.

Alfamale
02-01-2010, 01:50 AM
just finished Shutter Island -- pretty good psychological thriller/suspense/mystery. can't wait to follow it up with the movie.

opening up Chuck Palaniuk's Rant.

Montana
02-01-2010, 02:12 AM
"Rant" was excellent......loved the 'documentary' style of narrative.

Alfamale
02-01-2010, 02:27 AM
the first chapter kicked ass!!

MindzEye
02-01-2010, 02:38 AM
Reading "Satanic Purses" right now, a look at the 'rise' of Bin Laden & Al Qaeda through the 90's, with a focus on the money trail and Bin Laden's actual purpose within the group. It paints a much different picture of Bin Laden than the one we're provided by western media. Basically describes him as a talented project manager, and excellent at raising funds for those projects (He was tolerated in the Sudan during the 90's due to these talents and his ability to get public projects completed), but it also describes him as being very politically and ideologically simple, to the point of being mocked by the Sudanese leadership "all he knows how to say is jihad, jihad, jihad" and treated like a pariah by the Taliban, who tried very hard to broker a deal with the U.S to get rid of him prior to the invasion.

Focuses on the monetary aspect of these islamic groups (doesn't just focus on Al Qaeda) more than any one individual topic. Pretty fascinating so far.

Alfamale
03-24-2010, 09:10 AM
just polished off The End Of Oil.

now opening up The Next 100 Years -- through a few chapters now, this book is fascinating.

Factinista
03-24-2010, 12:23 PM
I finally got around to reading Franny and Zooey by Salinger a few weeks ago, and I really liked it. It's been a while seen I read Catcher in the Rye, but I think I like this one a lot better.

zeke
03-24-2010, 01:11 PM
I have recently re-released my 13 year old nerdself, and have devoured me some classic Larry Niven sci-fi. great stuff.

axlsalinger
03-24-2010, 03:21 PM
Great stuff Fact. Love that book.

I just finished reading The Lost Symbol, by Dan Brown. Not bad, not his best. Da Vinci Code was way better. Brown really knows how to create suspense, and his books are page-turners, even if they're not all that well written and full of implausible events. About a third of the way through, I found myself thinking that Teeds might enjoy this one. Maybe not so much the last third. All in all, it's a good read, nothing special but I do enjoy the way he drops a lot of real facts and history into the narrative, there's a lot more to the original design of Washington D.C. than meets the eye.

Currently reading a book called Is Paris Burning?, which is a very respected and thoroughly researched book about the end of the German occupation of Paris. I'm about a quarter of the way through, and so far, it's been RIVETING. Highly recommended, if you're interested in that sort of thing.

Hoss
03-26-2010, 08:57 PM
okay.... I know I may get killed for this, but I am reading for the first time "The Catcher in the Rye"...

I know that that is sacrilege that I haven't read it yet, but it just never was on any of my school syllabus' and just never got to it.

So before leaving for Vegas I read these posts, then I saw it at the book store and while in Vegas I heard it referenced on some show on TV. Or maybe it was the announcement of Salinger's death.

I am a big proponent of things coming into your life for a reason and since it came at me three times, I knew I had to buy it and read it. I am only about halfway through, and I am glad I never read it or even have been involved in discussions about it, because I really have/ had no idea of what it's about or even where it's really going.

I would love to discuss some of the feelings after completion. But by the sounds of it, Axl may have some super indepth thoughts.

IrishWolfman
03-26-2010, 09:12 PM
Memoirs by Brian Mulroney

I've been on a bit of a bio kick for the last few years. It's led to me reading some real doorstops.

axlsalinger
03-27-2010, 03:56 AM
okay.... I know I may get killed for this, but I am reading for the first time "The Catcher in the Rye"...

I know that that is sacrilege that I haven't read it yet, but it just never was on any of my school syllabus' and just never got to it.

So before leaving for Vegas I read these posts, then I saw it at the book store and while in Vegas I heard it referenced on some show on TV. Or maybe it was the announcement of Salinger's death.

I am a big proponent of things coming into your life for a reason and since it came at me three times, I knew I had to buy it and read it. I am only about halfway through, and I am glad I never read it or even have been involved in discussions about it, because I really have/ had no idea of what it's about or even where it's really going.

I would love to discuss some of the feelings after completion. But by the sounds of it, Axl may have some super indepth thoughts.Will be curious to hear what you thought of it when you're done.

BeLeafer
03-27-2010, 03:26 PM
Rise of the Vulcans by James Mann

All the dirt on the neocon scumbags in Bush's war cabinet.

Alfamale
03-27-2010, 07:45 PM
down with the neo-cons!

vermettefan
03-28-2010, 11:22 AM
Natural Harvest - A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes
http://www.lulu.com/content/4956212

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients - you will love this cook book!

Alfamale
03-28-2010, 11:35 AM
^^^^^^

LoL!

leafman101
03-28-2010, 12:03 PM
okay.... I know I may get killed for this, but I am reading for the first time "The Catcher in the Rye"...

I know that that is sacrilege that I haven't read it yet, but it just never was on any of my school syllabus' and just never got to it.

So before leaving for Vegas I read these posts, then I saw it at the book store and while in Vegas I heard it referenced on some show on TV. Or maybe it was the announcement of Salinger's death.

I am a big proponent of things coming into your life for a reason and since it came at me three times, I knew I had to buy it and read it. I am only about halfway through, and I am glad I never read it or even have been involved in discussions about it, because I really have/ had no idea of what it's about or even where it's really going.

I would love to discuss some of the feelings after completion. But by the sounds of it, Axl may have some super indepth thoughts.

You guys should check out the latest South Park.

YouTube- South Park Season 14 ~ the Tale of Scrotie McBoogerballs

JaysCyYoung
03-28-2010, 01:35 PM
Natural Harvest - A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes
http://www.lulu.com/content/4956212

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients - you will love this cook book!

Is...that...real???

Factinista
03-28-2010, 01:37 PM
Jesus Christ vern ahahaha

axlsalinger
03-28-2010, 02:27 PM
http://img94.imageshack.us/img94/8954/naturalharvest.jpg (http://img94.imageshack.us/i/naturalharvest.jpg/)

zeke
03-28-2010, 02:48 PM
I mean, what the ****?

Montana
03-28-2010, 03:42 PM
That's pure genius

LeafHound69
03-28-2010, 11:30 PM
So what is that sauce- like, feltch?

Leafovic
03-29-2010, 02:07 PM
not so good with Outliers trying to ignore the importance of talent, and reducing everything to hard work + luck.

Just read "Outliers".

I think his point is that attaining success comes down to understanding the world around us(ie figuring out where the advantages are) Since, in his opinion, opportunity is mostly a result of arbitrary and lucky advantages.


Personally, I don't think he's even really questioning talent here.

Leafovic
03-31-2010, 12:24 PM
Guys, what are some similar reads to "Outliers"?

I see there are some pretty big critics of Malcolm.

zeke
03-31-2010, 12:35 PM
Just saw this - my criticisms of him are based more on his interviews I've seen and read where he seems to be pretty adamant that talent is a very, very small part of the equation.

Leafovic
03-31-2010, 12:49 PM
Just saw this - my criticisms of him are based more on his interviews I've seen and read where he seems to be pretty adamant that talent is a very, very small part of the equation.

I was referring more to the criticism he's received from other authors.

Montana
03-31-2010, 12:52 PM
It's not so much that he finds it to be a small part of the equation, it's more that he simply finds it less interesting to examine.

He believes talent is a large part of the equation, but that talent alone can only lead you so far......which is why he uses the example of Derrick Coleman, who many regard as the most talented basketball player they've ever seen........he simply lacked all the other qualities needed maximize those abilities.

Montana
03-31-2010, 12:57 PM
I was referring more to the criticism he's received from other authors.


I think you'd enjoy all Gladwell's stuff to be honest.....his collection of essays is a great read ("What the Dog Saw"), as is 'Tipping Point', and 'Blink'.

Dubner and Levitt's "Freakonomics" and "SuperFreakonomics" are two great reads you're liable to enjoy as well.

I'd also suggest Michael Lewis' "The Big Short" or "Liar's Poker" two quality reads as well.

zeke
03-31-2010, 12:59 PM
I wanna read the Big Short for sure.

Leafovic
03-31-2010, 01:00 PM
It's not so much that he finds it to be a small part of the equation, it's more that he simply finds it less interesting to examine.

He believes talent is a large part of the equation, but that talent alone can only lead you so far......which is why he uses the example of Derrick Coleman, who many regard as the most talented basketball player they've ever seen........he simply lacked all the other qualities needed maximize those abilities.

I think its fair to say the book isn't "ground-breaking" but I thought it was useful if you look at it from a nation building perspective. It gives solid proof that our system right now is pretty random, in large part do to this belief that we are self-made and our innate abilities decide all. He shows that its not so, success is actually pretty damn random but it doesn't have to be...so whether that entails changing how our school system is, to looking at ourselves, our family, our environment and deciding what role our culture/ethnicity plays in our success..its possible for opportunity to be equal.

The reason it seems he is downplaying talent is only because he thinks we don't do a good enough job of deciding who has talent in the first place. And THAT is the issue.

Leafovic
03-31-2010, 01:13 PM
I think you'd enjoy all Gladwell's stuff to be honest.....his collection of essays is a great read ("What the Dog Saw"), as is 'Tipping Point', and 'Blink'.

Dubner and Levitt's "Freakonomics" and "SuperFreakonomics" are two great reads you're liable to enjoy as well.

I'd also suggest Michael Lewis' "The Big Short" or "Liar's Poker" two quality reads as well.

Thanks :thumbsup(22):

Montana
03-31-2010, 01:23 PM
I think its fair to say the book isn't "ground-breaking" but I thought it was useful if you look at it from a nation building perspective. It gives solid proof that our system right now is pretty random, in large part do to this belief that we are self-made and our innate abilities decide all. He shows that its not so, success is actually pretty damn random but it doesn't have to be...so whether that entails changing how our school system is, to looking at ourselves, our family, our environment and deciding what role our culture/ethnicity plays in our success..its possible for opportunity to be equal.

The reason it seems he is downplaying talent is only because he thinks we don't do a good enough job of deciding who has talent in the first place. And THAT is the issue.


I agree with him 100%........talent is only one portion of the equation of success..........in fact I'm shocked on a daily basis how many people I meet/witness who end up being very talented that possess little to no worthwhile talent whatsoever. On the flip side, I also know tons of people with immense talent who don't make use of it.

I also agree with the idea that it's not very interesting a narrative, when you read about people who make it on talent alone.....hence how great a read Outliers is overall.


....and you're right, you're not liable to inspire too many people if the basis of your book is to outline how important god given talent is to any kind of success.

Alfamale
03-31-2010, 07:08 PM
onto Generation Kill.

Montana
03-31-2010, 07:14 PM
onto Generation Kill.

Excellent companion to the series......I recommend re-watching it as you read.

BeLeafer
04-05-2010, 08:11 PM
The Coming of the Third Reich
by Richard Evans

A very well written and thought out text that covers the rise of Nazism in Germany. It's written in an accessible form for anyone to pick up and read. He does an exceptional job of covering the issues at each step with a very good nuanced and balanced understanding with depth. Highly recommend this to anyone interested in this subject - which, imo, everyone should be.

The only issue I have with it is that he places too much emphasis on the fallout from WWI's impact on social and political aspects of Germany society that affected the rise of the Nazis. It's an important aspect but he puts a bit too much weight on it.

axlsalinger
04-05-2010, 08:29 PM
Thanks for the recommendation, I was about to search for something along those lines, having just read Is Paris Burning? by Larry Collins and Dominique Lapierre (an account of the end of the German occupation of Paris). I highly recommend that one, by the way.

Montana
04-05-2010, 08:34 PM
Rise of the Third Reich
by Richard Evans

A very well written and thought out text that covers the rise of Nazism in Germany. It's written in an accessible form for anyone to pick up and read. He does an exceptional job of covering the issues at each step with a very good nuanced and balanced understanding with depth. Highly recommend this to anyone interested in this subject - which, imo, everyone should be.

The only issue I have with it is that he places too much emphasis on the fallout from WWI's impact on social and political aspects of Germany society that affected the rise of the Nazis. It's an important aspect but he puts a bit too much weight on it.

F*cked that you'd mention that book, as I was with my nephew on Saturday and he was looking for that exact book, but they didn't have any copies in stock at Chapters.

Any suggestions on where he might find a copy?

axlsalinger
04-05-2010, 08:37 PM
Also for anyone who's read both, how does it compare to The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer?

Just doing some digging, looks like Richard Evans actually wrote 3 books in this series:

- The Coming of the Third Reich
- The Third Reich in Power
- The Third Reich at War

That what you're referring to, BL? And did you reach the first one, or a compilation of all three?

BeLeafer
04-05-2010, 08:43 PM
Oops, it's actually titled The Coming of the Third Reich.


F*cked that you'd mention that book, as I was with my nephew on Saturday and he was looking for that exact book, but they didn't have any copies in stock at Chapters.

Any suggestions on where he might find a copy?

Amazon ca has it in stock at a reasonable price in paper (~$17). I got a hard copy at a remaindered bookstore on Bloor in the Annex here in T.O for about $25, I think.

axl ... much better than Schirer's.

BeLeafer
04-05-2010, 08:45 PM
And did you reach the first one, or a compilation of all three?

Fixed it above.

No, haven't read the others but will because he's an exceptionally good historian.

Montana
04-05-2010, 08:55 PM
Oops, it's actually titled The Coming of the Third Reich.



Amazon ca has it in stock at a reasonable price in paper (~$17). I got a hard copy at a remaindered bookstore on Bloor in the Annex here in T.O for about $25, I think.

axl ... much better than Schirer's.

Even stranger as he said he was looking for "The Rise of...".....hence my not being able to find it on amazon after the fact.

Thanks for the heads up, I'll let him know (then borrow it to read myself after he's done, heh)

BeLeafer
04-06-2010, 09:05 PM
Not a bad plan.

As far as the title goes, easy to do that - so many of this subject are titled with "rise" it's easy to do. I can attest!

zeke
04-07-2010, 12:19 PM
Just polished off A.C.Clarke's 2001.

can't believe I had never read it earlier.

acescanuck
04-07-2010, 12:35 PM
Just started this. So far so good. Anyone else read it?

http://aninsideoutsock.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/freakonomics1.jpg

Leafovic
04-07-2010, 12:44 PM
Yeah. I just finished it yesterday. It's a good read. There is no single theme to really take away but its a refreshing way to look at economics.

acescanuck
04-07-2010, 12:46 PM
Seems to be some interesting topics in it. It is neat to see the relationships from one to another.

zeke
04-07-2010, 12:57 PM
the sequel superfreakonomics is also a great read.

BeLeafer
04-10-2010, 08:01 AM
Stalin's Wars: from World War to Cold War, 1939-1953
by Geoffrey Roberts

Just starting this one. So far, very good reading. Roberts makes good use of the archival materials now available to western scholars. He suggests that the flip side of the cult of personality is to treat Stalin as the devil ... equally inaccurate. Opens up to a seemingly fairer, balanced treatment of Stalin.

JaysCyYoung
04-10-2010, 01:49 PM
Just reading a collection of short stories involving Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Haven't read it in a few years, but it's making me want to watch the latest film version again.

IrishWolfman
04-11-2010, 03:44 PM
Finally finished the Mulroney Memoirs.

Looking for opinions on which book I should tackle next.

"The Brothers Karamazov"

or

"The Invincible Quest: The Life of Richard Milhous Nixon"

Montana
04-11-2010, 03:51 PM
Dostoyevsky > Conrad.

BeLeafer
04-19-2010, 08:00 PM
The Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy.

By Adam Tooze

This could be a snoozer but I have a pal who is writing a related research paper and he wants me to read this to help with our discussions on his work.

Alfamale
04-20-2010, 08:14 PM
The Rise Of The Fourth Reich -- just started it today. it's about the men behind the funding to the nazi war machine and where they go after the destruction of germany. so far, so good.

also picked up American Lion, the story of andrew jackson, and One Minute To Midnight, a comprehensive re-telling of the cuban missile crisis, with perspectives altering amongst the key players.

Alfamale
04-20-2010, 08:21 PM
i've also been chipping away at war and peace over the past few weeks, just because i own it and might as well read it.have you finished this yet, mbow? i'm kinda wanting to read it, but i'm also looking for a more factual account of Napoleon's escapades through Russia.

lecoqsportif
04-20-2010, 08:23 PM
The Rise Of The Fourth Reich -- just started it today. it's about the men behind the funding to the nazi war machine and where they go after the destruction of germany. so far, so good.

Texas?

lecoqsportif
04-20-2010, 08:23 PM
have you finished this yet, mbow? i'm kinda wanting to read it, but i'm also looking for a more factual account of Napoleon's escapades through Russia.

Amazon.com: Moscow 1812: Napoleon's Fatal March (9780061075582): Adam Zamoyski: Books

Alfamale
04-20-2010, 08:30 PM
Texas?a few i'm sure -- and thx for the link. have you read that one yourself?

lecoqsportif
04-20-2010, 08:32 PM
"The Invincible Quest: The Life of Richard Milhous Nixon"

I started reading this doorstop, but I got distracted: I couldn't read the book without psycho-analyzing Black's evil mind.

e.g. "... venerable quasi-fascist dictator Francisco Franco..."

"Venerable"? "Quasi"? Sheesh.

lecoqsportif
04-20-2010, 08:33 PM
a few i'm sure -- and thx for the link. have you read that one yourself?

Yep. I detected a somewhat pro-Polish narrative (hence pro-Napoleon), but it's still quite good.

BeLeafer
04-26-2010, 10:14 PM
The Mass Psychology of Fascism.

by Wilhelm Reich

A brilliant text. Rereading it to help alleviate the torture of reading economic history. It's actually quite illuminating to read this alongside Tooze's economic history of the Nazi regime.

Habspatrol
04-27-2010, 01:39 AM
I just started reading a book that my great uncle (Lucien Vinet) wrote in the 1940s. It's called "I Was A Priest." It's actually pretty amazing. He was a Roman Catholic Priest in southern Manitoba and left when he saw and learned a lot of horrible things. He actually blows the lid off of a lot of things including mass, purgatory and confession. I just started reading it today and am not very far in so I am mostly going off of the forward and what my mom has told me about it.

Cheech
04-27-2010, 01:44 AM
I'm reading Charm School by Nelson Demille. Its about Soviet Russia and a pilot school of 300 trapped american air force pilots. Pretty good Thriller. I have also read all the Michael Crichton books, and I would recommend them to anyone who is into science thrillers. State of Fear is an amazing book I thought.

Alfamale
05-19-2010, 11:09 PM
Storm Troops -- about canada's military role in WW1. some really interesting stuff here. i didn't realize how much ass canadian soldiers kicked over there!

example being vimy ridge. the germans had taken the strategic piece of land and had easily been able to repel all british and french attempts to retake it. canadians asked for their chance to take vimy back, and were practically laughed at. eventually we got our chance and sent the germans running!

for the first 2 years of the war (1914-15), the canadians took their share of lumps while learning how to fight this new type of war. after their baptism by fire, they didn't lose a single battle over the remaining 2 years of the war. many soldiers of the central powers found the canadians to be the fiercest fighters in the entire war.

Alfamale
05-21-2010, 10:42 AM
just bought 3 books:

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter
George, Nicholas, & Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins & The Road To WW1
Pronto (from the Raylan Givens stories)

KingTucker
05-21-2010, 02:53 PM
Paris 1919 by Margaret Macmillan.

Great expose about the 1919 Peace Conference, all the political goings on and subterfuge, negotiations and a fairly decent look at the time period as well.

Great stuff in there...when you start out reading about Wilson's secretary of state sending carrier pigeon messages to his family, you know you're not in Blackberry Land, so to speak. :)

Habspatrol
05-22-2010, 01:04 AM
I just started reading a book that my great uncle (Lucien Vinet) wrote in the 1940s. It's called "I Was A Priest." It's actually pretty amazing. He was a Roman Catholic Priest in southern Manitoba and left when he saw and learned a lot of horrible things. He actually blows the lid off of a lot of things including mass, purgatory and confession. I just started reading it today and am not very far in so I am mostly going off of the forward and what my mom has told me about it.

It's amazing the shit that was going on in the Catholic Church in the 1940's and somehow it still hasn't really been dealt with.

The stuff that my uncle talks about in this book is mind boggling and the fact that it was all very common knowledge within the church is amazing... and disgusting.

SundinsTooth
06-14-2010, 10:39 PM
Anyone read this?

http://img.amazon.ca/images/I/51K1Yru9vPL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU15_.jpg

Sounds really great, and it's something I've never heard about.


From the New York Times-bestselling author of In Harm's Way comes a true-life story of American soldiers overcoming great odds to achieve a stunning military victory.

Horse Soldiers is the dramatic account of a small band of Special Forces soldiers who secretly entered Afghanistan following 9/11 and rode to war on horses against the Taliban. Outnumbered forty to one, they pursued the enemy across mountainous terrain and, after a series of intense battles, captured the city of Mazar-i-Sharif, which was strategically essential if they were to defeat the Taliban.

The bone-weary American soldiers were welcomed as liberators, and overjoyed Afghans thronged the streets. Then the action took a wholly unexpected turn. During a surrender of six hundred Taliban troops, the Horse Soldiers were ambushed. Dangerously outnumbered, they fought for their lives in the city's immense fortress, Qala-i-Janghi, or the House of War. At risk were the military gains of the entire campaign: if the soldiers perished or were captured, the effort to defeat the Taliban might be doomed.

As the Americans struggled to hold the fortress, they faced some of the most intense urban warfare of our time. But until now the full story of the Horse Soldiers has never been told. Doug Stanton received unprecedented cooperation from the U.S. Army's Special Forces soldiers and Special Operations helicopter pilots, as well as access to voluminous after-battle reports. In addition, he interviewed more than one hundred participants and walked every inch of the climactic battleground.

This exciting story is filled with unforgettable characters: brave Special Forces soldiers, tough CIA operatives, cunning Afghan warlords, anxious stateside soldiers' wives who do not know where their husbands have gone, and humble Afghan boys spying on the Taliban.

Deeply researched and beautifully written, Stanton's account of America's quest to liberate an oppressed people touches the mythic. The Horse Soldiers combined ancient strategies of cavalry warfare with twenty-first-century aerial bombardment technology to perform a seemingly impossible feat. Moreover, their careful effort to win the hearts of local townspeople and avoid civilian casualties proved a valuable lesson for America's ongoing efforts in Afghanistan.

Horse Soldiers is a big-hearted and thrilling read, with an epic story that reaches not just across the cold mountains of Afghanistan but into the homes of small-town America, and confirms Doug Stanton as one of our country's preeminent storytellers.

SundinsTooth
06-14-2010, 10:42 PM
Just finished up a good read....
http://img.amazon.ca/images/I/51fB5XbQLnL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU15_.jpg

Solid read...really enjoyed the honesty.

JaysCyYoung
06-14-2010, 10:43 PM
I would LOVE to read that one, ST. I'll have to pick it up.

SundinsTooth
06-14-2010, 10:51 PM
No kidding - it sounds surreal, like something out of the 30's. I really want to read it, and got it high on my bday list. A blurb on their compares it to Blackhawk Down...a fave of mine.

hockeylover
06-14-2010, 11:28 PM
BTW guys, I kinda hate you for making me want to spend all my money at Chapters. Some really really interesting book recommendations here. Ones that piqued my interest are "I Was a Priest" and any of the WWII books. Actually, has anyone read "God is Not Great: How Religion Ruins Everything"? Wanna give that a read too.

Probably my biggest pet peeve is guys I meet who can't believe I read. "For fun?" Ugh. So unattractive. I had a guy say that to me today actually. All of you guys are awesome.

MindzEye
06-14-2010, 11:47 PM
I kinda hate you for making me want to spend all my money at Chapters.

Order used off of their website, or Amazon.ca

I'd have to work a 2nd job to afford my book collection if I had bought them all new.

mbow30
06-15-2010, 12:04 AM
Paris 1919 by Margaret Macmillan.

Great expose about the 1919 Peace Conference, all the political goings on and subterfuge, negotiations and a fairly decent look at the time period as well.

Great stuff in there...when you start out reading about Wilson's secretary of state sending carrier pigeon messages to his family, you know you're not in Blackberry Land, so to speak. :)

this is such a terrific book.. glad to hear you enjoyed it.

as for me -- i have been busy as all hell the past few months. but along the way have read 'the ascent of money' by niall ferguson and just started 'the rise and fall of the third reich' by shirer.

that one's gonna take me a while...

hockeylover
06-15-2010, 12:10 AM
Any good sports related books you guys can recommend?

Habspatrol
06-15-2010, 06:44 AM
BTW guys, I kinda hate you for making me want to spend all my money at Chapters. Some really really interesting book recommendations here. Ones that piqued my interest are "I Was a Priest" and any of the WWII books. Actually, has anyone read "God is Not Great: How Religion Ruins Everything"? Wanna give that a read too.

Probably my biggest pet peeve is guys I meet who can't believe I read. "For fun?" Ugh. So unattractive. I had a guy say that to me today actually. All of you guys are awesome.

Definitely recommended. I have no idea how if it's available anywhere. I'm sure it is.

I found this excerpt where he gives one example how confession is used to control the parishioners.

One note, I believe the book must have been written in French and the translated before being published. He always refers to himself as "we" or "us." It's a bit strange but you get used to it. Even though he left the Catholic Church he remained very religious.




Chapter VI -- THE MENTAL TORTURES OF CONFESSION

(c) CONFESSION OF A MARRIED WOMAN

A married woman enters the confessional. She will tell a strange man secrets which she probably would not dare to reveal to her own husband. She is even bound to reveal certain secrets of her husband. This especially happens when a sin is committed with the consent of both husband and wife. In the Roman Church, birth control of all variety is a sin and must be confessed with all its circumstances. The husband might be of Protestant Faith and his Roman Catholic wife will have to disclose to the priest the most intimate relations of their marital life. The priest will know more about the wife than the husband. There are no more family secrets because Rome has required that hearts and souls should be fully explored by priests. In this manner, Romanism controls the whole intimate lives of married couples.

A married woman, who has any amount of natural discretion and honesty, will enter the confessional with apprehension and often despair. She fears that terrible and infallible questionnaire. It is impossible to describe the mental inconvenience she now experiences by the spectre of compulsory confession. One married woman who had not much to confess anyway, told us one day that this obligation of telling everything to the priest was "diabolical" and we could not admit to her at that time that she was absolutely right.

The questionnaire in the case of a married woman goes somewhat like this:

"How often do you perform your conjugal duties?

Do you refuse to perform them sometimes? Why ?

How many times ?

Are your marital actions complete?

Could conception take place?

Do you use contraceptives?

How many times?

Any thoughts, desires, actions for other men but your husband, etc., etc. ?"

Poor Roman Catholic women! We know so well that your kind souls are tortured to death by this terrible Roman obligation of telling, not only your sins, but also the most intimate secrets of your married life. You are free, of course, to practice the prescriptions of your Church. As an ex-priest, we will never even suggest that you be unfaithful to your convictions, but as an ex-priest we can also tell you that these mental tortures imposed upon your souls are not a prescription of the Saviour of mankind to obtain forgiveness of your sins, but are pure inventions of men to keep your minds and hearts under the control of a system, the torturous Roman religious organization.

Your secrets that you have confided to us in confession will be forever kept and never divulged, you may have no fear of that. Ex-priests who have had the courage to shake the shackles of Rome are naturally too honest to divulge secrets confided to them. But we must admit, that as a priest we had no power to forgive your sins.

No priest has such power. Christ is the ONLY Mediator between God and men. He alone can give grace and salvation. This is not my opinion only but it is the teaching of Christ Himself. "I AM THE WAY, THE TRUTH, AND THE LIFE; NO MAN COMETH UNTO THE FATHER BUT BY ME." (John 14:6).

http://www.cuttingedge.org/NEWS/IWasaPriest.htm

Habspatrol
06-15-2010, 06:58 AM
Here he talks a bit about some of the common practices. Pretty amazing that this shit still hasn't been dealt with by the church when it was such common knowledge within the church.


“The seminaries, or training centres, as they were known were infested with the traditional ‘chattage’ which is common ‘entertainment’ of priests and students. The word ‘chattage’ is a consecrated expression in Quebec institutions, which means an abnormal and intimate friendship between male inhabitants of these colleges. One lover is the robust, active and manly type, while his partner is rather young, delicate, effeminate and passive. The normal effects of these unnatural marriages, of course, are homosexuality and sex crimes of all descriptions. Students, for reasons of confession or spiritual direction, spend much time in the intimacy of a priest’s study, which is in most cases, his bedroom. We have seen students closeted for hours with priests and we were asked to believe that this ordeal did much to train young men to high spirituality and Romanism.”


http://www.cuttingedge.org/news/RoadToThePriesthood.htm

JaysCyYoung
06-15-2010, 11:57 AM
Any good sports related books you guys can recommend?

I know you're probably not a huge baseball fan, HL but I picked up "Baseball by the Numbers: Why Everything You Think You Know About the Game is Probably Wrong" and have never thought about evaluating players or the history of the game in the same way ever again. It's a bit technical and dry in parts but the analysis is first-rate.

hockeylover
06-15-2010, 12:03 PM
I know you're probably not a huge baseball fan, HL but I picked up "Baseball by the Numbers: Why Everything You Think You Know About the Game is Probably Wrong" and have never thought about evaluating players or the history of the game in the same way ever again. It's a bit technical and dry in parts but the analysis is first-rate.

Actually, I was hoping you'd have more non-hockey suggestions for me. I just ordered Moneyball. I really wanna read "Prophets of the Sandlot" as mentioned in Future Greats & Heartbreaks.

JaysCyYoung
06-15-2010, 12:12 PM
I read Moneyball online about four months ago. Lewis is a pretty accomplished author so I wanted to check out some of his other sports books.

Montana
06-15-2010, 01:22 PM
I know you're probably not a huge baseball fan, HL but I picked up "Baseball by the Numbers: Why Everything You Think You Know About the Game is Probably Wrong" and have never thought about evaluating players or the history of the game in the same way ever again. It's a bit technical and dry in parts but the analysis is first-rate.

Love "Baseball between the Numbers"....got it a couple years ago when I was ordering my annual Baseball Prospectus......excellent book. A must own for stat junkies such as ourselves.

Speaking of 'Moneyball', a nice accompaniment to it, is Buzz Bissinger's "3 Nights in August".....not that it's so much 'anti-stats' but it's more about the old school feel of baseball, as Bissingers spends a 3 game series (Cubs-Cards) tailing Tony Larusa around, and you get the feel for the minutia of the game, that stats might not fully explain.

http://a3.vox.com/6a00cd97850789f9cc00d4141a8b0b685e-500pi

Moneyball is still better........but it's a nice read none the less.

Montana
06-15-2010, 01:27 PM
Currently reading....

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51X6-f--%2BXL._SL500_.jpg


The great book hockeylover and JayCyYoung often mention.......and one that I'd been meaning to read for years but just finally got around to picking up. For any Leafs fans/draft junkies out there it's a must read.

It's particularly interesting given that it kicks off talking about the behind the scenes of the 2006 draft, with some discussions about how Kessel was perceived the year prior to his draft (some scouts had him ranked neck and neck with Crosby)......to how much his stock dropped in the next year, and how his interview with the Blue Jackets went.......

In fact, I'm kind of glad I ended up taking as long as I did to pick it up, as it's somewhat more interesting reading it now, as we know how so many of the players have developed, so it's more interesting reading about how they were perceived heading into the draft.......Staal, Toews, Backstrom, Brassard, Kessel, Johnson, etc etc...

I'm only some 50-60 odd pages in so far, but I'm loving it..

axlsalinger
06-15-2010, 01:54 PM
I'd definitely recommend Seven Seconds or Less, by Jack McCallum. Newspaper writer initially spent some time in training camp with the Phoenix Suns for an article, acting as a "pretend" assistant coach. It went so well that they decided to continue the experimient for a full season. Really quick and fun read.

http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/3463/sevenseconds.jpg (http://img508.imageshack.us/i/sevenseconds.jpg/)

Alfamale
06-21-2010, 10:46 AM
just nabbed 4 new books:

Einstein: His Life & Universe
Caesar: A History
Bonnie & Clyde: Lives Of The Legend
Attila The Hun: Barbarian Of Terror

Factinista
06-21-2010, 10:54 AM
Cartesian Linguistics and New Horizons on the Study of Language and Mind by Noamar Chomskiapara.

They're grrrrrrrreat!

LeafNation
06-21-2010, 05:43 PM
In getting ready for the season upon us, I usually read the almanac published by the great people at Footballoutsiders.com at this time of year , for inside info w/ real inside the numbers data on players/units.. followed by KC Joyner's great yearly entry of "Scientific Football", which is similar in ways, and also great.

the 2010 editions are coming out in a couple of weeks, for both publications -- but I've been catching up on their 09 editions as a reminder before I dig in to the 2010 babies.. they're fantastic!!,

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd123/pro--sports/FO2009.jpg

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd123/pro--sports/fo10009.jpg

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd123/pro--sports/july8fo.jpg

vermettefan
06-21-2010, 06:04 PM
Finished this book last week and loved it. It's mostly all Q&A style interviews with all the top traders during the 80's.
http://imgur.com/VVjRv.jpg

PlayerToBeNamedLater
06-23-2010, 09:32 AM
http://grissanti.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/green-eggs-and-ham.jpg

Artnes
06-23-2010, 09:52 AM
http://pics.blameitonthevoices.com/032009/chuck_norris_vs_mr_t.jpg

and

http://shalottianshards.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/manlinessalphabet.jpg