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Montana
10-06-2012, 03:08 PM
Bout time we had a thread dedicated to this topic, instead of stuffing anything new or interesting into the News thread.



http://img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1999/einsteincover991231.jpg


http://i.huffpost.com/gen/760596/thumbs/o-SOLVAY-CONFERENCE-570.jpg?4


http://www.biography.com/imported/images/Biography/Images/Profiles/N/Sir-Isaac-Newton-9422656-1-402.jpg


http://www.lucente.org/blog/media/1/20090211-darwin.jpg


http://www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/sagan.jpg


http://www.whatsarahsees.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/feynman13.jpg


http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/famous-physicists-11.jpg


http://sgtr.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/stephen-hawking.jpg

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/198/020/BRTky.jpg?1320962111

theREALkoreaboy
10-06-2012, 03:09 PM
as long as science honours the restraining order to stay 500 yards away from religion at all times, i'm fine with this.

Preston_Mizzi
10-06-2012, 03:10 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXyYbQ0SmDQ

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:10 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_4fb_RZpbk

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:10 PM
Something very, very interesting is happening with Voyager 1, the human probe that’s the very farthest from Earth.

New data from the spacecraft, which I will discuss below, indicate Voyager 1 may have exited the solar system for good. If true, this would mark a truly historic moment for the human race — sending a spacecraft beyond the edge of our home solar system.

At last check, NASA scientists said they were not yet ready to officially declare that Voyager 1 had officially exited the solar system by crossing the heliopause.

To cross this boundary scientists say they would need to observe three things:

1. An increase in high-energy cosmic rays originating from outside our solar system

2. A drop in charged particles emanating from the sun.

3. A change in the direction of the magnetic field.

As I reported in June, in regard to the first point, scientists have observed a sustained increase in galactic cosmic rays during recent months.

http://blog.chron.com/sciguy/files/2012/10/v1pg.3m-600x461.gif


With respect to the second point, there has been a dramatic and sustained drop in charged particles (principally protons) originating from the Sun that have struck the spacecraft.

And by dramatic, I mean dramatic. Here’s how it looks:

http://blog.chron.com/sciguy/files/2012/10/voyagerla1rate-600x492.jpg

I have reached out to Edward Stone, the Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, who has oversight of the mission. He has not responded to my query about whether this means Voyager has truly exited the system.

The third question is whether the magnetic field affecting Voyager has changed. That data is not yet definitive, said Dave McComas, a heliopause expert with the Southwest Research Institute. “In the end, the magnetometer data will have to tell us if Voyager1 has crossed the heliopause or the disconnection boundary,” McComas told me.

http://blog.chron.com/sciguy/files/2012/10/heliopause1-600x520.jpg

However Nick Suntzeff, a Texas A&M University astronomer, said based upon the stunning drop in charged particles, something is definitely happening to Voyager that NASA should be commenting upon:

“Even without the magnetometer data, the Voyager 1 data shows that it has gone through a huge barrier at the edge of the solar system. These guys are defining it based on their theory which requires a transition zone where the magnetic fields decouple. Maybe this is true. But the fact remains that the satellite has gone through a discontinuity in cosmic ray fluxes that is incredible. It is interacting with the boundary of the Solar System. I think that the data stand on their merit – something wonderful ( a line from the movie 2010) has happened”

Which is to say that NASA may be making an important announcement about Voyager 1 in the not too distant future.





Blows my f*cking mind that our species is about to have accomplished something like this....

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:11 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pfwY2TNehw

theREALkoreaboy
10-06-2012, 03:12 PM
voyager>>>>>>

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=danYFxGnFxQ

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XELfhVVVkmg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmaOcPYCGMA&feature=related

zeke
10-06-2012, 03:17 PM
http://silenced.co/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/cs-1-6creation.jpg
http://www.wartgames.com/themes/religions/bible_creation.gif

zeke
10-06-2012, 03:19 PM
http://www.irfi.org/articles/articles_1751_1800/10%20weird%20religious%20practiceshtml_files/image010.jpg

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:19 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHbYJfwFgOU

zeke
10-06-2012, 03:20 PM
This is the best science program I've ever watched:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgBWDPXF2gU

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:21 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk&feature=relmfu

SundinsTooth
10-06-2012, 03:23 PM
Thought I would share....I am working on my 4th year thesis (which is hopefully going to turn into my Masters project) in the GRIME (groundwater research) group at UWaterloo.

My planning stages are underway and I am going to investigate the use of biochar in reducing chromium contamination in groundwater. By monitoring the isotope ratios we are hoping that we can figure out the processes involved when a oxidized species reduces to a less mobile version of itself. Not mind bending stuff like astronomy but fascinating to consider nonetheless.

Biochar is a neat concept - it is found in soils in South America and it is seen that it has been there for 1000's of years. It doesn't degrade quickly and it is amazing at capturing carbon and keeping it out of the atmosphere. This is due to the fact that it is created by burning it in a anaerobic environment. The carbon stays locked up in the mass (normally burned wood, vegetation, etc.) and we can then spread it in soils or in aquifer material. If it is properly ground up into small enough components it offers a very very large surface area that acts as a catalyst to encourage the reduction of toxic elements into benign forms as contaminated water flows through. (Think activated carbon).

Anyways, sorry for the length. Carry on.

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:23 PM
This is the best science program I've ever watched:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgBWDPXF2gU

If you enjoyed that, check out astrophysicist Brian Cox' BBC series' "Wonders of the Solar System" and "Wonders of the Universe".......they're great.

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTBIr65cL_E&feature=related

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:26 PM
Thought I would share....I am working on my 4th year thesis (which is hopefully going to turn into my Masters project) in the GRIME (groundwater research) group at UWaterloo.

My planning stages are underway and I am going to investigate the use of biochar in reducing chromium contamination in groundwater. By monitoring the isotope ratios we are hoping that we can figure out the processes involved when a oxidized species reduces to a less mobile version of itself. Not mind bending stuff like astronomy but fascinating to consider nonetheless.

Biochar is a neat concept - it is found in soils in South America and it is seen that it has been there for 1000's of years. It doesn't degrade quickly and it is amazing at capturing carbon and keeping it out of the atmosphere. This is due to the fact that it is created by burning it in a anaerobic environment. The carbon stays locked up in the mass (normally burned wood, vegetation, etc.) and we can then spread it in soils or in aquifer material. If it is properly ground up into small enough components it offers a very very large surface area that acts as a catalyst to encourage the reduction of toxic elements into benign forms as contaminated water flows through. (Think activated carbon).

Anyways, sorry for the length. Carry on.


Brilliant stuff.....definitely keep us posted here on how yours research goes.

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:33 PM
Obviously only theoretical, but.....



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkxieS-6WuA



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySBaYMESb8o&feature=fvwrel

Montana
10-06-2012, 03:37 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_X2B5OK1I

Kritter
10-06-2012, 03:38 PM
If you enjoyed that, check out astrophysicist Brian Cox' BBC series' "Wonders of the Solar System" and "Wonders of the Universe".......they're great.


http://eztv.it/search/

Go there. Do a search for BBC. Those shows are on the list that comes up.

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_MmCE73bXk&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnsbZzJ2H_k&feature=related

Bleedsblue&white
10-06-2012, 03:42 PM
This gives me hope for our species.

http://www.virgingalactic.com/

My grand-kids have a good chance at an affordable trip into outer-space. That is awesome.

JaysCyYoung
10-06-2012, 03:54 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEP50dxfRAw&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEl9kVl6KPc&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vfOpZD4Sm8&feature=related

hockeylover
10-06-2012, 04:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rikEWuBrkHc

Rep. Broun: Evolution, Embryology, Big Bang Theory Are "Lies Straight From The Pit Of Hell"

Montana
10-06-2012, 05:01 PM
http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/69077_482085341812482_1052909089_n.jpg

hockeylover
10-06-2012, 06:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rie1qs3Zg8

This is pretty cool. 15 year old winner of the 2012 Intel Science Fair comes up with inexpensive test to detect pancreatic cancer using carbon nanotubes.

JohnnyHolmes
10-06-2012, 07:23 PM
This gives me hope for our species.

http://www.virgingalactic.com/

My grand-kids have a good chance at an affordable trip into outer-space. That is awesome.

Yeah, I hear outerspace in nice in the summer.

Deckie007
10-06-2012, 10:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk&feature=relmfu

Thanks for posting that. It was surprisingly easy to understand. I've read about the forces and different kinds of particles, string theory etc, but this actually made it all come together. Like this Michio Kaku.

Also Tyson is a badass. That bit about stupid design was great.

Montana
10-07-2012, 05:19 AM
If you enjoyed Kaku, check this series out from Brian Greene......he's another great theoretical physicist who does a good job of simplifying things....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7060RTp92A



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLQicI2RhFg



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QljobFhs9pg



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrlYIn7OxQk

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 10:03 AM
Had an MRI last night....talk about practical quantum physics being not only confirmed but manipulated in a way that we can peek inside your noggin.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGcZvSG805Y

teeds
10-07-2012, 10:47 AM
How old are you ST? And why are you getting MRI's on your head?

mbow30
10-07-2012, 10:50 AM
don't worry, teeds, he wore one of these

http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/tin-foil-hat.jpg

JohnnyHolmes
10-07-2012, 11:10 AM
I had an MRI a few years ago. It's really not pleasant. The tech told me that it's pretty common for people to freak out.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 11:16 AM
How old are you ST? And why are you getting MRI's on your head?

I have a history of aneurysm in the family so it was a baseline scan - nothing to fret about.

Bleedsblue&white
10-07-2012, 11:16 AM
Yeah, I hear outerspace in nice in the summer.

What could possibly be negative about having a chance to see the Earth from space, let alone a chance to see the stars from the other side of out atmosphere?

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 11:17 AM
I had an MRI a few years ago. It's really not pleasant. The tech told me that it's pretty common for people to freak out.

I can see that...although I found it peaceful and surreal, it could easily turn into a panic mode if you let your mind race.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 11:30 AM
KB's feelings on science and religion aside, check out this guy's remarks....and keep in mind this man sits on the House Science Committee.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBy3MbP4WDo

Transcript.


BROUN: God's word is true. I've come to understand that. All that stuff I was taught about evolution and embryology and the Big Bang Theory, all that is lies straight from the pit of Hell. And it's lies to try to keep me and all the folks who were taught that from understanding that they need a savior. You see, there are a lot of scientific data that I've found out as a scientist that actually show that this is really a young Earth. I don't believe that the Earth's but about 9,000 years old. I believe it was created in six days as we know them. That's what the Bible says.

And what I've come to learn is that - it's the manufacturer's handbook, is what I call it. It teaches us how to run our lives individually, how to run our families, how to run our churches. But it teaches us how to run all of public policy and everything in society. And that's the reason as your congressman I hold the Holy Bible as being the major directions to me of how I vote in Washington, D.C., and I'll continue to do that.

JohnnyHolmes
10-07-2012, 11:48 AM
What could possibly be negative about having a chance to see the Earth from space, let alone a chance to see the stars from the other side of out atmosphere?

I don't know. Perhaps the astronauts from the Challenger or the Columbia could answer that better than me.

CH1
10-07-2012, 11:52 AM
Lunatics like Broun are the best argument for voting against Mitt Romney. Gotta stop this loony anti-science agenda.

Habspatrol
10-07-2012, 12:38 PM
KB's feelings on science and religion aside, check out this guy's remarks....and keep in mind this man sits on the House Science Committee.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBy3MbP4WDo

Transcript.

Wow... just wow.

Gotta love the 300 deer heads on the wall too.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 12:40 PM
If you are the devil - do you not think plan A would be to get the human race to turn its back on science and progress?

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 12:50 PM
I don't know. Perhaps the astronauts from the Challenger or the Columbia could answer that better than me.

The problem was the shuttle technology was hilariously outdated and inefficient. Mankind has still never lost a single person in space. All the deaths have taken place within Earth.

Habspatrol
10-07-2012, 12:53 PM
If you believe in the bible then you believe the devil will do whatever he can to make you doubt the existence of god. If you believe in science then you are less likely to believe the bible or in the existence of god.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 01:00 PM
The problem was the shuttle technology was hilariously outdated and inefficient. Mankind has still never lost a single person in space. All the deaths have taken place within Earth.

Hmm, I think a whole crew was lost in space....Soyuz 11 all died in space (well at least what we define as space).

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 01:08 PM
Hmm, I think a whole crew was lost in space....Soyuz 11 all died in space (well at least what we define as space).

I don't know if we would define Soyuz 11 as space deaths given that they died re-entering the atmosphere. In fact, the Soviets didn't even know anything was wrong (the spacecraft landed fine) until they opened up the chamber and found that it had completely de-pressurized.

Talk about a quick way to go.

Challenger is kind of interesting because the crew capsule on the shuttle was so well designed (reinforced aluminum alloy) the crew actually survived the entire sequence of events until the capsule struck the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, if you check some NASA videos of the event you can see the crew chamber fire off unharmed from the external fuel tanks.

CH1
10-07-2012, 01:11 PM
If these folks truly believe in God why do they hate gays as they will only be a nuisance for a short time here on earth. (80 yrs compared to 80 gazillion years in heaven). Also, can't they just pray away the deficit?

Montana
10-07-2012, 01:27 PM
Challenger is kind of interesting because the crew capsule on the shuttle was so well designed (reinforced aluminum alloy) the crew actually survived the entire sequence of events until the capsule struck the Atlantic Ocean.

My family used to spent our winters down in Florida, and my dad was a big NASA fan so seeing that disaster live on TV was a huge moment of my childhood......yet I never knew this fact until just now. That's crazy.


You kinda just blew my mind.

Habspatrol
10-07-2012, 01:35 PM
I didn't know that either. Crazy.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 01:44 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqcd_3daPQ8


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqTmSFkBqkg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ejP8qJsNo

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 01:45 PM
My family used to spent our winters down in Florida, and my dad was a big NASA fan so seeing that disaster live on TV was a huge moment of my childhood......yet I never knew this fact until just now. That's crazy.


You kinda just blew my mind.

Yeah, it's not very well-known. In fact, during recovery operations three of the seven astronauts were found to have initiated their external oxygen apparatuses (which was basically a back-up breathing unit), indicating that they were aware of the possible de-pressurization in the cabin. The other four likely passed out before they died.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 02:18 PM
I don't know if we would define Soyuz 11 as space deaths given that they died re-entering the atmosphere. In fact, the Soviets didn't even know anything was wrong (the spacecraft landed fine) until they opened up the chamber and found that it had completely de-pressurized.

Talk about a quick way to go.

Challenger is kind of interesting because the crew capsule on the shuttle was so well designed (reinforced aluminum alloy) the crew actually survived the entire sequence of events until the capsule struck the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, if you check some NASA videos of the event you can see the crew chamber fire off unharmed from the external fuel tanks.

No they died instantly in space when they detached....when they separated they had a complete failure in a valve that depressurized the capsule and asphyxiated the crew. It is known as the first case of a man dying in space.


Here is the Russian release


"At approximately 723 seconds after retrofire, the 12 Soyuz pyro cartridges fired simultaneously instead of sequentially to separate the two modules .... the force of the discharge caused the internal mechanism of the pressure equalization valve to release a seal that was usually discarded pyrotechnically much later to adjust the cabin pressure automatically. When the valve opened at a height of 168 kilometers the gradual but steady loss of pressure was fatal to the crew within about 30 seconds. By 935 seconds after retrofire, the cabin pressure had dropped to zero....... ...only trough analysis of telemetry records of the attitude control system thruster firings that ahd been made to counteract the force of the escaping gases and through the pyrotechnic powder traces found in the throat of the pressure equalization valve were Soviet specialists able to determine that the valve had malfunctioned and had been the sole cause of the deaths."

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 02:21 PM
Yeah, I wouldn't call Soyuz a space death. More like an atmospheric death. At least, it wasn't a deep space death which is what I was referring to originally.

They were only 104 miles above Earth at the time.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 02:26 PM
Pretty cool Voyager video:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Na1mLpjxmYY


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqPB0l5FZP4&feature=related

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 02:27 PM
Yeah, I wouldn't call Soyuz a space death. More like an atmospheric death. At least, it wasn't a deep space death which is what I was referring to originally.

They were only 104 miles above Earth at the time.

Space death is space death...which this was. Deep space is something mankind hasn't even managed to explore, so that makes no sense.

For the record - space is considered anything beyond the 100 km asl. This was way over that line.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 02:53 PM
This is pretty damn fantastic:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9w-i5oZqaQ

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 03:05 PM
3 hours! Wow. Heard about this guy...talk about intensive research.

Good stuff.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 03:14 PM
It just boggles my mind (well, not really) that the Ancient Aliens crew can't even identify the type of rock present at some of these sites correctly.

Calling sandstone granite and then claiming that ancient peoples would have been unable to work these materials, while we have evidence of trial and error attempts AT THE SAME SITE, including evidence of the simple but effective techniques at working the stones, is just pure ignorance.

SundinsTooth
10-07-2012, 03:20 PM
No kidding and then to blatantly lie about the wrong stone? I mean diorite is hard but it's not impossible for ancient people to carve.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 03:24 PM
No kidding and then to blatantly lie about the wrong stone? I mean diorite is hard but it's not impossible for ancient people to carve.

No kidding. In the very same series they repeatedly show, without irony, the infamous Pharaoh Khafre statue. It's one of the best examples of artisanship in the ancient world.

The stone employed by the masons? Diorite:

http://media.smithsonianmag.com/images/Sphinx-Pharaoh-Khafre-4.jpg

http://art103fall2009.pbworks.com/f/1255665525/Khafre%20side.jpg

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DusjmWgdpx8/T3dKdgwbnOI/AAAAAAAABiA/1kFI3hpcxvA/s1600/Khafre+Pharaoh+Statue.jpg

mbow30
10-07-2012, 04:02 PM
do you really need 3 hours to debunk this guy?

http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/2454385065/ancient-aliens-guy-big-hair-giorgio-tsoukalos.jpeg

im' pretty sure i just did it in the ~30 seconds it took me to image search on google and type up this post.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 04:05 PM
Well it's a lot more effective to specifically address each individual incorrect assertion made by pseudo-historians and pseudo-archaeologists. Otherwise they just claim that you're part of a suppressive collective dedicated to keeping the "real truth" from the minds of the public. If you use empirical means at your disposal to annihilate every argument that they are making it makes their case appear a whole lot weaker than simply dismissing them out of hand.

mbow30
10-07-2012, 04:07 PM
broun's wikipedia page

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c293/mbow30/broun.jpg

mbow30
10-07-2012, 04:08 PM
Well it's a lot more effective to specifically address each individual incorrect assertion made by pseudo-historians and pseudo-archaeologists. Otherwise they just claim that you're part of a suppressive collective dedicated to keeping the "real truth" from the minds of the public. If you use empirical means at your disposal to annihilate every argument that they are making it makes their case appear a whole lot weaker than simply dismissing them out of hand.

it really isn't necessary at all.

it's a crackpot show. anybody who doesn't realize that.... isn't going to spend 3 hours watching a youtube video debunking it.

JaysCyYoung
10-07-2012, 04:39 PM
Whatever.

The guy used science. It's a science thread. It was interesting to see the actual history and science behind everything.

Red
10-07-2012, 06:28 PM
Holy shit, the Challenger capsule survived the initial explosion... I had no idea. I doubted you at first and looked it up (as we all should) to confirm, and it sounds to me like there's very credible evidence.

So with that in mind, couldn't they have like, put a parachute on that thing for just such an occasion? I'm sure it's not that simple, but it seems to me like with a few more design iterations you could make that capsule and those inside it survive. Just saying - if they could make the capsule survive an explosion of that magnitude, surely they could slow down the capsule before impact, and make improvements to the environment inside to help the crew... ya know... not die?

Bleedsblue&white
10-07-2012, 07:40 PM
Men and women have died for progress since we first started trying; I would gladly take a trip into space. If I had the money I'd be in line now.

JohnnyHolmes
10-07-2012, 08:25 PM
People line up to buy iPhones and videogames though.

Red
10-08-2012, 08:47 AM
I've been giving a little bit of thought to the whole thing about Mitt promising to cut funding to PBS if he's elected. At first I didn't think much of it, but I'm quickly realizing there will be a lot of very valuable educational, scientific programming that will be sorely missed. That of course on top of the fact that he would be taking away some of the only children's educational programming of decent quality as well. And you know damn right he'll have no problem spending $200 billion/year on a war in Iran.

This also reminded me of Harper's decision to make our scientists get permission from the federal government before speaking to the media. So if it doesn't suit the Conservative agenda, they can prevent the public from ever hearing about it. I actually wrote my MP about it... 3 different emails, the third one threatened to make it a more public issue if I didn't get a response. He finally responded and his reasoning was that our scientists are employees of our federal government. If they were in a private company, the owner and executives would be able to dictate what is released to the public and what isn't. And this is no different. That, in a nutshell is what he said. I thanked him for his response and politely pointed out that the government works for the people of Canada, and the people of Canada want to hear everything our scientists are doing, regardless of how it makes us, and our government look.

If it's not going to affect how we vote, then at the very least, we should be speaking out against this kind of thing. It's been on CBC news multiple times, and yet, no one seems to care.

SundinsTooth
10-08-2012, 01:35 PM
http://sphotos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/304362_3315509940266_1321253398_n.jpg

Montana
10-09-2012, 01:24 AM
100-MILLION-YEAR-OLD SPIDER ATTACK FOUND IN AMBER


http://news.discovery.com/animals/2012/10/08/amber-spider-zoom.jpg

Researchers have found trapped in amber a rare dinosaur-age scene of a spider attacking a wasp caught in its web.

The piece of amber, which contains 15 intact strands of spider silk, provides the first fossil evidence of such an assault, the researchers said. It was excavated in a Burmese mine and dates back to the Early Cretaceous, between 97 million and 110 million years ago.

"This juvenile spider was going to make a meal out of a tiny parasitic wasp, but never quite got to it," George Poinar, Jr., a zoology professor at Oregon State University, said in a statement.

"This was a male wasp that suddenly found itself trapped in a spider web. This was the wasp's worst nightmare, and it never ended. The wasp was watching the spider just as it was about to be attacked, when tree resin flowed over and captured both of them."


http://news.discovery.com/animals/spider-attack-amber-121009.html

theREALkoreaboy
10-09-2012, 07:10 PM
scary, primitive, primal $hit. a brain-eating amoeba with a 98% fatality rate.....

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/deadly-brain-eating-amoeba-resurfaces-pakistani-city-163517524.html

SundinsTooth
10-09-2012, 07:22 PM
scary, primitive, primal $hit. a brain-eating amoeba with a 98% fatality rate.....

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/deadly-brain-eating-amoeba-resurfaces-pakistani-city-163517524.html

Thank the lord this guy is as rare as he is. I have read about a couple of cases in the Southern US. Warm lake water and muddy sediments = breeding ground and then if you are unlucky enough to inhale this up your nose it could be lights out.

theREALkoreaboy
10-09-2012, 07:25 PM
$hit like this just freaks me out. you have no defence against it, nothing you can do about it, no treatment, and a 98% chance of death.

JaysCyYoung
10-09-2012, 07:30 PM
Are you also afraid of ebola?

SundinsTooth
10-09-2012, 07:30 PM
$hit like this just freaks me out. you have no defence against it, nothing you can do about it, no treatment, and a 98% chance of death.

Be way more scared of heart disease, my man. Or plane crashes.

SundinsTooth
10-09-2012, 07:33 PM
I've been seeing more and more people using nitrogen in cooking and drinking - just beware it's definitely not the most level headed activity out there.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/World/2012/10/09/20269736.html


A British woman spent her 18th birthday in hospital getting her stomach removed after drinking a cocktail made with liquid nitrogen.

Police say Gaby Scanlon was celebrating her birthday with friends at Oscar's wine bar in Lancaster on Thursday, when she ordered a steaming cocktail.

She soon suffered extreme stomach pain and was taken to hospital, where she was diagnosed with a perforated stomach and had to have emergency surgery to remove her stomach. If she hadn't had the surgery, doctors say she would have died.

She will have to limit her food intake and take vitamin supplements for the rest of her life.

The bar has since taken the drink off the menu.

"The premises involved have fully co-operated with all agencies and have suspended drinks involving liquid nitrogen," a Lancashire Police spokesperson said.




"This is a tragic and life-changing incident for an 18-year-old girl who was celebrating her birthday. The use of liquid nitrogen in bars is not illegal, however, we are continuing to look into the matter and will be working closely with our partners from other agencies."

Liquid nitrogen is the gas nitrogen cooled until it becomes liquid. It is often used to cool drinks and create a steaming effect.

But the liquid nitrogen must be fully evaporated before someone consumes food or drinks prepared with it because it can be fatal to ingest. That's because even though it's not toxic, it's so cold it causes internal frostbite.

mbow30
10-10-2012, 09:40 AM
this is pretty cool

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/index.html

Aberdeen
10-11-2012, 02:12 AM
World needs more of...

http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/what-are-grand-technology-and-scientific-challenges-21st-century

What are grand technology and scientific challenges for the 21st century?
DARPA and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy want public input on The Next Big Things


What are the next Big Things in science and technology? Teleportation? Unlimited clean Energy? The scientists and researchers at DARPA and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy put out a public call this week for ideas that could form what they call the Grand Challenges - ambitious yet achievable goals that that would herald serious breakthroughs in science and technology

Montana
10-11-2012, 01:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXmVnHgwOZs&feature=player_embedded#!

voyager
10-11-2012, 03:57 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsbBT118Rbw

Volcanologist
10-11-2012, 05:36 PM
scary, primitive, primal $hit. a brain-eating amoeba with a 98% fatality rate.....

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/deadly-brain-eating-amoeba-resurfaces-pakistani-city-163517524.html

Wow, how's it feel to be in the lucky 2% man?

Volcanologist
10-11-2012, 05:36 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsbBT118Rbw

Lies from the infernal pit, clearly.

zeke
10-11-2012, 05:46 PM
Wow, how's it feel to be in the lucky 2% man?

Nice.

hockeylover
10-11-2012, 06:31 PM
Wow, how's it feel to be in the lucky 2% man?

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTZuMNNoqnl4UOFhd-7a_2zlq8xXdYmfjw9zb6iIk7_pqJhNIRbyg

lecoqsportif
10-11-2012, 06:37 PM
Wow, how's it feel to be in the lucky 2% man?

Quality.:thumbsup(22):

lecoqsportif
10-11-2012, 06:52 PM
do you really need 3 hours to debunk this guy?

http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/2454385065/ancient-aliens-guy-big-hair-giorgio-tsoukalos.jpeg

im' pretty sure i just did it in the ~30 seconds it took me to image search on google and type up this post.

I watched a little bit of it, for shits and giggles. I came away with two things. First, he says that people should view it with an "open mind", prior to slamming all nonsense. Weird, IMO. Is he directing that to his former community of paranoids who shiver in the New Mexican nights or hang around grassy knolls in Dallas? He must be. Also, part of his refutation largely based on the scholarly work of, ya know, professional archeologists/anthropologists who have produced a litany of scholarly works in peer reviews trade publications that explain how all of this happened. The body of knowledge has been there or was in train... so as self-professed former ancient alien cultist, does he not come across as a naive rube who suddenly had an epiphany that wouldn't have occurred if he didn't have a fevered mind?

JaysCyYoung
10-11-2012, 08:28 PM
That's over-analyzing it way too much.

lecoqsportif
10-11-2012, 09:23 PM
Not really. He just confirmed that people who really know about this stuff, um, understand how it happened.

Aliens not required.

That could have summed up in 5 minutes.

JaysCyYoung
10-11-2012, 10:40 PM
Most people have no idea how most of those monuments were constructed. Showing the actual methods at places like Baalbek and other sites takes a little longer than five minutes.

lecoqsportif
10-11-2012, 10:46 PM
Well, it seems to me he spends most of his time point out these people are charlatans and kooks. Even without any training in archeology or anthropology, I think a large majority of people figure these structures weren't built by aliens using levitation technology.

JaysCyYoung
10-11-2012, 10:49 PM
You'd be surprised at how many people have such low opinions of our predecessors in other societies that they do in fact attribute marvelous ancient engineering and construction to extraterrestrial forces.

These are also the type of people who would claim that some sort of hidden knowledge is being suppressed or that there is a collective conspiracy designed to hide the truth. That's why addressing each of their specific claims on a point by point basis is so effective. If one just casually dismisses them they don't learn anything new or they don't question their beliefs. People like the video's creator eventually altered their foolish beliefs because they were challenged and then taught the actual techniques at each site.

It's important knowledge if even just a few of the subscribers to the ancient astronaut hypothesis re-evaluate their belief system. That makes everything worthwhile for traditional archaeologists and experts in these fields: they no longer have to try and shout through the crazies who attempt to detract from their work in the field and the lab.

lecoqsportif
10-11-2012, 11:50 PM
So... recommendations for good science reading for amateurs like me? I'm aware of the giga classics, like Cosmos or Six Easy Pieces. I also have Einstein for Dummies, which has done nothing except make me feel really stupid.

Montana
10-12-2012, 12:00 AM
Michio Kaku's books are pretty entertaining...."Hyperspace" "Parallel Worlds", "Physics of the Impossible"....

Brian Greene's "Elegant Universe" and "Fabric of the Cosmos"....

Brian Cox' "Why does E=mc2"...


...and absolutely anything by Richard Feynman.

lecoqsportif
10-12-2012, 12:02 AM
I did buy a collectors edition, a very nice one, of the Origin of the Species when our first kid was born.

It serves as the family bible.

Montana
10-12-2012, 12:04 AM
There are few things better, that a parent can do for their kid, than fill the house with as much knowledge as possible...

zeke
10-12-2012, 01:50 AM
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/files/photos/5/52cc8f9c-b574-4fc4-9b2a-55680956874b.html?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

a giant eyeball from a mysterious sea creature washed ashore and was found by a man walking the beach in Pompano Beach, Fla. on Wednesday.....

http://hosted.ap.org/photos/5/52cc8f9c-b574-4fc4-9b2a-55680956874b-big.jpg

leafman101
10-12-2012, 09:34 AM
As it flares out of the distant Oort Cloud, the newly discovered comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) appears to be heading on a trajectory that could make for one of the most spectacular night-sky events in living memory. Why is this comet expected to be so unique? Two reasons:

Astronomers predict that the comet will pass just 1.16 million miles from the Sun as it swings around its perihelion, or closest approach. (This may seem like a lot, but remember—the Sun is big. If we were to scale the Sun down to the size of Earth, the comet would pass well within the orbits of dozens of satellites.) The close approach will melt enormous amounts of the comet’s ice, releasing dust and gas and forming what should be a magnificent tail.

After it loops around the Sun and forms this tail, the comet should then pass relatively close to Earth—not near enough to cause any worry, but close enough to put on a great show. Viewers in the Northern Hemisphere will get the best view as the comet blooms in the weeks approaching Christmas 2013. The comet could grow as bright as the full moon.



http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2012/10/05/once-in-a-civilization-comet-to-zip-past-earth-next-year/?WT_mc_id=SA_CAT_SPC_20121011

leafman101
10-12-2012, 09:38 AM
Astronomers find diamond planet Cancri 55 e, twice the size of Earth Scientists have reported the existence of a "diamond planet" twice the size of Earth, and eight times its mass, zooming around a nearby star.

In fact, this is not the first diamond planet ever discovered, but it is the first found orbiting a sun-like star and whose chemical makeup has been specified.
The discovery means that distant rocky planets can no longer be assumed to have chemical constituents, interiors, atmospheres, or biologies similar to those of Earth, said lead researcher Nikku Madhusudhan, a Yale postdoctoral researcher in physics and astronomy.


http://www.news.com.au/technology/sci-tech/astrnomers-find-diamond-planet-cancri-55-e-twice-the-size-of-earth/story-fn5fsgyc-1226494069968

SundinsTooth
10-12-2012, 09:46 AM
So... recommendations for good science reading for amateurs like me? I'm aware of the giga classics, like Cosmos or Six Easy Pieces. I also have Einstein for Dummies, which has done nothing except make me feel really stupid.


There is a biography of the world's most famous equation E=MC^2 that is really great. It goes through each component and tells a little of the history for each. For example it has a chapter on the equal sign. Pretty easy read with some cool tidbits.

Montana
10-12-2012, 10:55 AM
Who's the author?....might read that once I'm done Cox' book.

CH1
10-12-2012, 11:00 AM
You'd be surprised at how many people have such low opinions of our predecessors in other societies that they do in fact attribute marvelous ancient engineering and construction to extraterrestrial forces.

These are also the type of people who would claim that some sort of hidden knowledge is being suppressed or that there is a collective conspiracy designed to hide the truth. That's why addressing each of their specific claims on a point by point basis is so effective. If one just casually dismisses them they don't learn anything new or they don't question their beliefs. People like the video's creator eventually altered their foolish beliefs because they were challenged and then taught the actual techniques at each site.

It's important knowledge if even just a few of the subscribers to the ancient astronaut hypothesis re-evaluate their belief system. That makes everything worthwhile for traditional archaeologists and experts in these fields: they no longer have to try and shout through the crazies who attempt to detract from their work in the field and the lab.

I agree 100% but the crazies pull in more tv ratings and surefire watercooler moments.

SundinsTooth
10-12-2012, 11:10 AM
Who's the author?....might read that once I'm done Cox' book.


http://www.amazon.com/mc2-Biography-Worlds-Famous-Equation/dp/0425181642

If you have some time and really want to see the history of quantum mechanics in the words of the men who fine tuned it, check out Hawkings "The Dreams that Stuff is Made of". Warning - heavy use of math and physics....this is a collection of the papers that taken together show the history of the theory.

"God Created the Integers" is another absolutely perfect science book.

Check out the documentary BBC put out on the story of math. Part 2 is here -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N34bkZrQh90

Habsy
10-12-2012, 04:17 PM
You guys hear about this diamond planet? Pretty cool.

SundinsTooth
10-12-2012, 04:44 PM
You guys hear about this diamond planet? Pretty cool.

It's perplexing to say the least. How that much carbon could accumulate that close to a star is counterintuitive. Be cool if they could find one a little more similar to earth climate wise. They could have rivers of hydrocarbons.

MindzEye
10-12-2012, 06:45 PM
So you're saying we should invade the diamond planet for it's sweet, sweet rivers of hydrocarbon?


I'm in.

lecoqsportif
10-12-2012, 08:18 PM
DeBeers is gonna vaporize that planet with the Death Star.

Volcanologist
10-12-2012, 08:35 PM
It's perplexing to say the least. How that much carbon could accumulate that close to a star is counterintuitive. Be cool if they could find one a little more similar to earth climate wise. They could have rivers of hydrocarbons.

Please. You expect me to believe there were dinosaurs all the way out there? That is sub Fred.

MindzEye
10-12-2012, 08:36 PM
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00065/mhli/0065MH0073001000E1_DXXX.jpg

corksens
10-12-2012, 08:37 PM
http://images.rodolfogs.com.ar/img/nerd-homero-universitario.jpg

Habsy
10-12-2012, 09:29 PM
DeBeers is gonna vaporize that planet with the Death Star.

Ironic how they found a diamond planet shortly after letting private industry take over space exploration. Hmmm.

Surface temperature of only 3900 degrees too.

Habspatrol
10-12-2012, 09:43 PM
Ironic how they found a diamond planet shortly after letting private industry take over space exploration. Hmmm.

Surface temperature of only 3900 degrees too.

Yeah cause nothing was ever discovered before that. :rolleyes(2):

MindzEye
10-12-2012, 09:46 PM
Yeah, but never diamonds....

http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/9124205.jpg

Habsy
10-13-2012, 12:54 AM
Yeah cause nothing was ever discovered before that. :rolleyes(2):

**** up a perfectly good joke. Get married and lose your sense of humor already.

The point is they find diamonds to ENTICE private industry to build ships to get there. It's rocket science.

lecoqsportif
10-13-2012, 12:55 AM
Might be able to get a nice rock for cheap...

Aberdeen
10-13-2012, 03:06 AM
So... recommendations for good science reading for amateurs like me? I'm aware of the giga classics, like Cosmos or Six Easy Pieces. I also have Einstein for Dummies, which has done nothing except make me feel really stupid.

For pure imagination fodder I'd recommend "Indistinguishable from Magic" by Robert L Forward.

He blends fiction and non-fiction into alternating chapters witheach non-fiction chapter explaining the science of the chapter before. He really focuses on the type of stuff we may be able to do in a 100 years. Space travel, stuff like that.

Habspatrol
10-13-2012, 09:59 AM
**** up a perfectly good joke. Get married and lose your sense of humor already.

The point is they find diamonds to ENTICE private industry to build ships to get there. It's rocket science.

Shit... I forgot to ask the wife if I could use my sense of humor last night. My bad.

Habsy
10-13-2012, 12:23 PM
Heh, you're learning. Good.

mbow30
10-13-2012, 12:30 PM
So... recommendations for good science reading for amateurs like me? I'm aware of the giga classics, like Cosmos or Six Easy Pieces. I also have Einstein for Dummies, which has done nothing except make me feel really stupid.

http://www.amazon.com/Holy-Bible-King-James-Version/dp/0718010868

Freddie
10-13-2012, 02:02 PM
This is an interesting one.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/10/12/mysterious-elk-shaped-structure-discovered-in-russia/?intcmp=features

Hoss
10-13-2012, 06:38 PM
This is where the Meme of dude with the hair saying "Aliens" actually is appropriate.

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m98kahhaWv1re1icto2_250.jpg

SundinsTooth
10-14-2012, 12:10 PM
Check this out - Live feed of Baumgartner's freefall - can he break the speed of sound?

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

SundinsTooth
10-14-2012, 12:18 PM
He just entered the jet stream and his ground speed jumped to 100 mph.

Montana
10-14-2012, 12:22 PM
65 years ago today that Chuck Yaeger originally broke the sound barrier....

SundinsTooth
10-14-2012, 12:24 PM
That outside air pressure is something to watch...14 psi at ground and now it's just a hair under 3 psi.

Habspatrol
10-14-2012, 12:34 PM
How high is he going to go?

SundinsTooth
10-14-2012, 12:36 PM
How high is he going to go?

37 km

Habspatrol
10-14-2012, 12:38 PM
Holy shit, he's less than half way.

Montana
10-14-2012, 03:03 PM
For the Americans among us, or those with friends/family in the states here's something you can fill out/pass on that can help prevent planned cuts to NASA Planetary Exploration program....including future exploration of Mars, and Jupiter's moon "Europa".....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUikIIdG5Ts



https://secure3.convio.net/planet/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=139


...fill it out f*ckers, or force someone you know who lives in the states to do it.

Habsy
10-14-2012, 06:20 PM
Check this out - Live feed of Baumgartner's freefall - can he break the speed of sound?

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

I watched that earlier on TV, that was awesome.

Montana
10-18-2012, 03:52 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_MFhAoUUmQ

zeke
10-18-2012, 03:32 PM
http://theweek.com/article/index/235055/was-the-moon-once-part-of-earth


Was the moon once part of Earth?
Multiple studies add credence to the theory that a piece of our planet broke off billions of years ago, thanks to a massive collision between Earth and another orb...

zeke
10-18-2012, 03:33 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/17/science/space/new-planet-found-in-alpha-centauri.html


Bringing the search for another Earth about as close as it will ever get, a team of European astronomers was scheduled to announce on Wednesday that it had found a planet the same mass as Earth’s in Alpha Centauri, a triple star system that is the Sun’s closest neighbor, only 4.4 light-years away.....

zeke
10-18-2012, 03:33 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/16/us/space-planet-four-suns/index.html


Thirty-five years ago, a scene in the first "Star Wars" film captivated movie-goers: Luke Skywalker peering across the landscape of Tatooine -- a desert planet dominated by a pair of setting suns.
This week, reality trumped (science) fiction with an image even more enthralling: two amateur astronomers poring through data from deep, distant skies and discovering a planet with four suns.
NASA's website calls the phenomenon a circumbinary planet, or a planet that orbits two suns.
Rare enough on its own -- only six other circumbinary planets are known to exist -- this planet is orbited by two more distant stars, making it the first known quadruple sun system.....

Montana
10-18-2012, 03:47 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/17/science/space/new-planet-found-in-alpha-centauri.html


Shame the surface temperature is so insanely hot (think I read somewhere it's upwards of a thousand degrees).....that said it's pretty cool that they found this using the doppler method, and it clears the way for astronomers to potentially find other planets orbiting Alpha Centauri that might be within the Goldilocks zone.

Pull that off and it'll just be a matter of figuring out how to travel at or near the speed of light.....before we can start sending people to Earth 2.0

zeke
10-21-2012, 11:42 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/19/dinosaur-headbutts-fossils_n_1989794.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003


Raleigh, North Carolina—With domed heads and thick, bony skull protuberances, pachycephalosaurids are well known by seven-year-olds and paleontologists alike. The dinosaurs are thought to have used their thick domes to headbutt each other, perhaps as part of courtship behavior. But whereas children recreating these vicious displays simply ram plastic models of the animals together in a straight line, a study now suggests that pachycephalosaurs may have bashed one another in a number of different ways.

The work, presented this week at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology's annual meeting in Raleigh, North Carolina, started with just one pachycephalosaur fossil. “We were looking at a dome and noticed these lesions that looked like they were from injuries,” explains Joseph Peterson, a paleontologist at the University of Wisconsin in Oshkosh. He wondered whether the fossilized injury was one of a kind — or whether such lesions were common. To find out, Peterson and his colleague Collin Dischler started examining more domes.......

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/824596/thumbs/r-DINOSAUR-HEADBUTTS-large570.jpg?8

Montana
10-22-2012, 01:54 PM
Animated GIF of how a fetus' face forms in the womb.

http://i.imgur.com/X0T0e.gif

Leo Bannister
10-22-2012, 04:11 PM
Reminds me of this guy - 2751

Volcanologist
10-22-2012, 06:28 PM
actually it reminds me of this guy

http://www.hockeyhermit.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/jason-blake.jpg

SundinsTooth
10-22-2012, 06:42 PM
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/italy-scientists-guilty-in-quake-trial/story-e6frf7k6-1226501174787

Next week they start burning witches again.



Italy scientists guilty in quake trial
Ella Ide From: AAP October 23, 2012 9:11AM
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SIX Italian scientists and a government official have been found guilty of multiple manslaughter for underestimating the risks of a killer earthquake in L'Aquila in 2009.


SIX ITALIAN SCIENTISTS HAVE BEEN SENTENCED TO JAIL FOR UNDERESTIMATING THE RISKS OF AN EARTHQUAKE. AAP


They were sentenced to six years in jail on Monday in a watershed ruling in a case that has provoked outrage in the international science community.

Habspatrol
10-22-2012, 11:03 PM
Wow... that's horrible. Is Italy that backwards?

JohnnyHolmes
10-22-2012, 11:33 PM
As they build closer and closer to Mt. Vesuvius...

Yeah Italy is backwards.

SundinsTooth
10-23-2012, 08:07 AM
Wow... that's horrible. Is Italy that backwards?

It's going to backfire on them as geoscientists sour on the country and leave for greener pastures.

MindzEye
10-23-2012, 10:35 AM
It's going to backfire on them as geoscientists sour on the country and leave for greener pastures.

Yep...there is about to be a brain drain of epic proportions if this isn't overturned and many words of apology aren't spoken to the entire scientific community. Surely if you were a cancer researcher, astronomer, or basically do any type of research on subjects that have a potentially poor outcome for people, this would give you a moments pause.

Kritter
10-23-2012, 11:50 AM
I am not sure what the system is in Italy, but it would be hard to believe if that verdict doesn't get overturned.

MindzEye
10-23-2012, 08:01 PM
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/138315-mit-creates-hydrophobic-material-that-could-revolutionize-fossil-and-nuclear-power-plants


A team of nanomaterial scientists and mechanical engineers at MIT have created a superhydrophobic material that is 10,000 times more slippery than existing hydrophobic surface. This could seriously boost the efficiency of fossil fuel power plants, and many other technologies that include cooling towers, such as desalination plants.

Hydrophobic, as you have probably guessed, literally means “water fear.” There are hydrophobic substances that resolutely refuse to mix with water (such as oils and fats), and hydrophobic materials and coatings that prevent water from pooling on its surface. In scientific terms, hybrophobicity is caused by surfaces that disrupt the hydrogen bonding in water. So as to minimize the disruption to its molecular makeup, the water droplet pushes itself away from the surface to minimize its contact area, becoming a very tight droplet.

It is very easy to identify a hydrophobic material because water forms into droplets that rapidly roll around — such as on your car windshield, or on a freshly waxed hood/roof. The more hydrophobic the material, the stronger this effect is, until the water effectively floats or skims across the surface with very low friction.

This is obviously very useful on car windshields, but it’s also very useful in cooling towers. In a cooling tower, water vapor comes into contact with the cool surface of the tower, condenses, and then dribbles back down. Fossil fuel and nuclear power plants (some 80% of the world’s power production) use steam turbines to create electricity — and then cooling towers to condense the steam back into water. The problem, though, is that the inside of the cooling tower isn’t hydrophobic, so the water has a tendency to hang around, significantly reducing the tower’s efficiency. This new material from MIT could change that.

Montana
10-24-2012, 04:28 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ssc1GsqHds&feature=youtu.be


This cosmological simulation follows the development of a single disk galaxy over about 13.5 billion years, from shortly after the Big Bang to the present time. Colors indicate old stars (red), young stars (white and bright blue) and the distribution of gas density (pale blue); the view is 300,000 light-years across. The simulation ran on the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and required about 1 million CPU hours. It assumes a universe dominated by dark energy and dark matter.

If my math is accurate, each second of the video represents roughly 107 million years.

Aberdeen
10-24-2012, 05:08 AM
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/138315-mit-creates-hydrophobic-material-that-could-revolutionize-fossil-and-nuclear-power-plants

If I had a kid now I'd defo be pushing them towards material sciences, so many great advances coming. It's really merging with other fields: electronics, nano, particle physics.

SundinsTooth
10-24-2012, 07:44 AM
If I had a kid now I'd defo be pushing them towards material sciences, so many great advances coming. It's really merging with other fields: electronics, nano, particle physics.

Hard science to learn. I took some inorganic chemistry and some of the intro stuff on the material side made me think in potato.

Aberdeen
10-24-2012, 08:02 AM
Ya there's so much to it. But I think once you can really specialize it's more manageable. A friend of mine from Uni (elec eng) went on to get her PhD in Electroactive Polymers, artificial muscles and stuff. Now she's doing super cool stuff in Germany.

mbow30
10-24-2012, 09:46 AM
ya, there's a ton of research being done in canada on that stuff... a friend is just finishing a phd at queens where he's been doing work with scaffolds (basically, using cells as a 'scaffold' to grow tissue). his focus has been on spinal tissue.

another just started working on a phd at u of t... she is looking at the use of polymers and other synthetics that can be used for implants i.e. bones, joints, etc.

really fascinating stuff... we're on the verge of some pretty incredible breakthroughs vis-a-vis this research, and other work with stem cells.

Volcanologist
10-24-2012, 09:58 AM
nanotechnology >>>

worm
10-24-2012, 01:24 PM
flux capacitor >>>>

zeke
10-24-2012, 05:18 PM
http://www.businessinsider.com/beoings-counter-electronics-high-power-microwave-advanced-missile-project-2012-10


While the U.S. geared up for the second presidential debate last Tuesday, a building sat pulsing with computers, electronic surveillance, and security systems in the Utah high desert.

The unoccupied site was awaiting the test of a weapon the Pentagon requested four years ago to the day on 16 October, 2008.

The Counter-Electronics High Power Microwave Advanced Missile Project (CHAMP), led by Boeing's Phantom works, promised to change the face of contemporary warfare, and its test was a complete success.

CHAMP flew over the Utah Test and Training Range last Tuesday, discharging a burst of High Power Microwaves onto the test site and brought down the compound's entire spectrum of electronic systems, apparently without producing any other damage at all. Even the camera recording the test was shut down.

Struggling to contain his enthusiasm, Boeing's Keith Coleman says, "We hit every target we wanted to. Today we made science fiction into science fact.".........



> horses & bayonets

Volcanologist
10-24-2012, 05:27 PM
"Phantom works". awesome.

and that is quite cool, but I imagine some kind of shielding could also be made.

MindzEye
10-24-2012, 05:32 PM
"Just" requires a sufficiently dense enough material. I could end with a KB joke here, but I'll leave that for the rest of you as a small gift.

JohnnyHolmes
10-24-2012, 11:37 PM
The Counter-Electronics High Power Microwave Advanced Missile Project (CHAMP)

That's a bad ass acronym. They deserve props on that alone.

MindzEye
10-24-2012, 11:41 PM
It's probably what the U.S government does best...make up program names with awesome, fitting ass acronyms.

zeke
10-24-2012, 11:58 PM
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/daryl3_1649.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/XVwNk.jpg

PlayerToBeNamedLater
10-27-2012, 10:39 AM
JoseCanseco U will not believe last night in fort worth I met 2 female aliens and they took advantage of me

hockeylover
10-28-2012, 07:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6iss-xq2-E&feature=related

SundinsTooth
10-29-2012, 09:13 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXHczjOg06w

zeke
10-29-2012, 03:28 PM
I think Microsoft might be back in the game with this Surface tablet. just including the detachable keyboard itself is a stroke of minor genius, and I think it might just kick the Ipad's ass all around.

http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/28/technology/mobile/microsoft-surface/index.html


EW YORK (CNNMoney) -- When it unveiled its Surface tablet, Microsoft pulled off something increasingly rare in the tech world: a true surprise.
Even notoriously tight-lipped Apple (AAPL, Fortune 500) can no longer keep details of its iGizmos from reaching the public ahead of the company's carefully crafted launch events.

Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) knew that if Surface details leaked out, the consequences could be disastrous. For the first time ever, it planned to bypass its PC manufacturing partners and directly compete with them. Also, Microsoft was extremely late to the tablet game. Tipping off rivals like Apple could have set Microsoft back even further.
That's why the company went to extreme -- sometimes painful and often hilariously excessive -- lengths to keep Surface a secret.
The development team worked in a secured building dubbed "The Vault." When choosing a name for the team -- a Microsoft custom -- the group picked "WDS," an acronym that stood for absolutely nothing. It was the winner of a contest held to pick the most obscure, nonsensical name -- one that could never be linked back to Surface.....

leafman101
10-29-2012, 04:02 PM
It all depends on Windows 8. That can help restore Microsofts share of the market, or speed up their plummet.

zeke
10-29-2012, 04:10 PM
windows 8 is an awkward hybrid. don't like it on a computer....but it might just work best on a tablet.

Bleedsblue&white
10-29-2012, 05:38 PM
It's hard to believe they were able to keep this a secret. ****ing amazing really.

Habspatrol
10-29-2012, 09:23 PM
Sweet, been thinking about getting a tablet. Maybe that's the one.

Habspatrol
10-29-2012, 09:24 PM
Also waiting for the next generation gaming console. Hoping the Playstation 4 comes out sometime in the not too distant future. Best guess I can find seems to be possibly Christmas 2013.

johnunit
10-29-2012, 11:56 PM
the iPad has been inferior to a TON of android tablets for ages. They bring out a limited, underpowered product and then don't improve it for a year or more. pathetic.

johnunit
10-29-2012, 11:57 PM
Also waiting for the next generation gaming console. Hoping the Playstation 4 comes out sometime in the not too distant future. Best guess I can find seems to be possibly Christmas 2013.

If it helps, it's predicted that the big 3 will all have their next gens out by feb '14.

zeke
10-30-2012, 12:06 AM
the iPad has been inferior to a TON of android tablets for ages. They bring out a limited, underpowered product and then don't improve it for a year or more. pathetic.

to be honest, my samsung android tablet sucks balls too. I still believe tablets are the future, but the ones I've used have been pretty much useless.

if the surface is as good as it looks, it will dominate, IMO.

johnunit
10-30-2012, 04:41 PM
to be honest, my samsung android tablet sucks balls too. I still believe tablets are the future, but the ones I've used have been pretty much useless.

if the surface is as good as it looks, it will dominate, IMO.

I'm not a fan of any of them as they sit really, but the ipad is the weakest of the bunch in terms of specs.

Habspatrol
10-30-2012, 11:13 PM
If it helps, it's predicted that the big 3 will all have their next gens out by feb '14.

Damn... that makes it worse. Now I'll have decisions to make. I think the PS4 will be the way to go though. I love the idea of free online gaming.

Volcanologist
10-30-2012, 11:54 PM
to be honest, my samsung android tablet sucks balls too.

well if it can do that then the surface tablet doesn't stand a chance.

Habspatrol
11-01-2012, 08:44 AM
Nice!! I need one.

Leafyblue
11-01-2012, 08:54 AM
Cue the Dongle jokes. :smilewinkgrin:

Montana
11-02-2012, 07:35 PM
In a much anticipated news teleconference broadcast online today, NASA scientists announced that the Curiosity Rover has not found any evidence of methane on Mars. Roughly 95 percent of methane in Earth's atmosphere comes from organisms, so if the rover had found any of this gas, it would have been incredible evidence of yet-to-detected microbial life on the planet. Scientists said they were not particularly surprised with the result.

The rover can detect methane in quantities greater than just a few parts per billion. Though it is certainly possible that trace methane exists at a level lower than that, such tiny amounts would not indicate the presence of life as more abundant quantities would. The amount, NASA said, "could be zero."


Damn.

Volcanologist
11-02-2012, 08:50 PM
so it's just a boring freezing irradiated piece of rock? oh well, at least we know for sure now.

Kritter
11-02-2012, 08:57 PM
http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1242/

Bleedsblue&white
11-03-2012, 12:54 AM
Damn.
Don't have a cow.

Bleedsblue&white
11-03-2012, 12:54 AM
Man.

MindzEye
11-03-2012, 09:48 AM
Damn.


Europa was always the logical choice for finding life in the solar system anyways.

leafman101
11-08-2012, 10:39 AM
The star HD 40307 was known to host three planets, all of them too near to support liquid water.

But research to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics has found three more - among them a "super-Earth" seven times our planet's mass, in the habitable zone where liquid water can exist.

Many more observations will be needed to confirm any other similarities.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20249753

Montana
11-09-2012, 03:19 AM
Is NASA about to unveil plans for a manned moon mission?

Suit up, people — word is we're heading back to the Moon.

According to space policy expert John Logsdon, there's a decent chance NASA has already cleared plans to establish a manned base on the far side of the Moon with the Obama administration. Thing is, they've probably been keeping it under wraps in the event that Romney had won Tuesday's election. Now that Obama has secured a second term, Logsdon says an announcement from the Agency could be forthcoming.

"NASA has been evolving its thinking, and its latest charts have inserted a new element of cislunar/lunar gateway/Earth-moon L2 sort of stuff into the plan," said Logsdon in an interview with SPACE.com's Mike Wall.

"They've been holding off announcing that until after the election," Logsdon added, noting that NASA's mission, direction, and budget could have been revised under a Romney administration.

An announcement would certainly gel with the Obama administration's ambitious agenda for space. In 2010, the President signed the NASA 2010 Authorization Act into law, freeing up close to $60 billion in NASA spending through 2013. This funding would serve as one of the first sparks in a plan to ignite a resurgence in space exploration, including an asteroid visit by 2025 and and a trip to Mars by the 2030s. A manned outpost at the Earth-moon L2 "gateway" — shown in the diagram below — could serve as an important stepping stone in our path out into the solar system.

http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/184ons4m7mja3jpg/xlarge.jpg

"NASA is executing President Obama's ambitious space exploration plan that includes missions around the moon, to asteroids, and ultimately putting humans on Mars," the Agency explained in a statement released at the end of September. "There are many options - and many routes - being discussed on our way to the Red Planet. In addition to the moon and an asteroid, other options may be considered as we look for ways to buy down risk - and make it easier - to get to Mars."

At the same time, Wall points out that NASA has been dropping plenty of hints as of late that a major announcement regarding human space exploration could be right on the horizon.

"We just recently delivered a comprehensive report to Congress outlining our destinations which makes clear that SLS [NASA's new heavy-lift "Space Launch System"] will go way beyond low-Earth orbit to explore the expansive space around the Earth-moon system, near-Earth asteroids, the moon, and ultimately, Mars," NASA deputy chief Lori Garver said at a conference in September.

"Let me say that again," she emphasized, "we're going back to the moon, attempting a first-ever mission to send humans to an asteroid and actively developing a plan to take Americans to Mars."

Read more about NASA's plans for sustainable human space exploration in this extensive pamphlet from NASA, released in June of this year.



My. Man. Barry.

johnunit
11-09-2012, 07:18 AM
**** yes.


Hopefully this ignites popular support for NASA so that they can actually get the budget to do it.

wiseguy1
11-09-2012, 01:24 PM
Last xmas break I read the book "The Strangest Man: The Hidden Life of Paul Dirac, Quantum Genius". Couldn't put the book down, fascinating read.

wiseguy1
11-09-2012, 01:25 PM
Aliens are already camping on the dark side of the moon and told mankind to stay the **** away. Didn't you hear? :)

zeke
11-09-2012, 02:07 PM
un-f moonbases

MindzEye
11-09-2012, 10:30 PM
****ing Science


http://www.washington.edu/news/2012/11/08/extra-chromosome-21-removed-from-down-syndrome-cell-line/



University of Washington scientists have succeeded in removing the extra copy of chromosome 21 in cell cultures derived from a person with Down syndrome, a condition in which the body’s cells contain three copies of chromosome 21 rather than the usual pair.

A triplicate of any chromosome is a serious genetic abnormality called a trisomy. Trisomies account for almost one-quarter of pregnancy loss from spontaneous miscarriages, according to the research team. Besides Down syndrome (trisomy 21), some other human trisomies are extra Y or X chromosomes, and Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), both of which have extremely high newborn fatality rates.

In their report appearing in the Nov. 2 edition of Cell Stem Cell, a team led by Dr. Li B. Li of the UW Department of Medicine described how they corrected trisomy 21 in human cell lines they grew in the lab. The senior scientists on the project were gene therapy researchers Dr. David W. Russell, professor of medicine and biochemistry, and Dr. Thalia Papayannopoulou, professor of medicine.

The targeted removal of a human trisomy, they noted, could have both clinical and research applications.

In live births, Down syndrome is the most frequent trisomy. The condition has characteristic eye, facial and hand features, and can cause many medical problems, including heart defects, impaired intellect, premature aging and dementia, and certain forms of leukemia, a type of blood cancer.

“We are certainly not proposing that the method we describe would lead to a treatment for Down syndrome,” Russell said. “What we are looking at is the possibility that medical scientists could create cell therapies for some of the blood-forming disorders that accompany Down syndrome.”

For example, he said, someday Down syndrome leukemia patients might have stem cells derived their own cells, and have the trisomy corrected in these lab-cultured cells. They could then receive a transplant of their own stem cells – minus the extra chromosome – or healthy blood cells created from their fixed stem cells and that therefore don’t promote leukemia, as part of their cancer care.

zeke
11-10-2012, 06:33 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2230226/Living-gel-walk-slowly-help-battle-cancer.html



Scientists have created a blob of gel that can propel itself across a surface, mimicking a living creature.

The tiny droplets are made in a laboratory from proteins extracted from living cells.

They feed on the same energy-carrying molecules found in living bodies, allowing the gel to ‘walk’ at a rate of 8 nanometres each step – less than the width of a speck of tobacco smoke.

Scientists say that the droplets could be used to deliver drugs or target cancer cells.

As the gel is made from biological material, it is less likely the body will reject it.

First, scientists have to succeed in controlling its movement accurately.

So far, researchers have only been able to influence how long the droplets stay in motion and the way they churn.

The gel can also self-heal, so it could help make liquid crystal displays – used in laptops and flat-screen televisions, watches and microwave ovens – more robust.

Aberdeen
11-11-2012, 03:41 PM
My. Man. Barry.

A little bit about this puppy in this video at around 14:30. NDT does a great description of Lagrangian points. Guy would have been an inspiring prof man.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVg-snQdrms

MindzEye
11-11-2012, 11:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2EmuyHoMAI&feature=youtu.be&t=6m6s

zeke
11-13-2012, 03:24 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20268044


http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/64098000/jpg/_64098590_scan_still_sized.jpg

A Canadian man who was believed to have been in a vegetative state for more than a decade, has been able to tell scientists that he is not in any pain.

It's the first time an uncommunicative, severely brain-injured patient has been able to give answers clinically relevant to their care.

Scott Routley, 39, was asked questions while having his brain activity scanned in an fMRI machine.

His doctor says the discovery means medical textbooks will need rewriting......

Montana
11-13-2012, 03:54 PM
That's f*cking incredible.

Bleedsblue&white
11-13-2012, 04:58 PM
It is, but all I can think of is being trapped like that for ten years.

worm
11-13-2012, 05:24 PM
It is, but all I can think of is being trapped like that for ten years.

Same here. I fear that.

Bleedsblue&white
11-13-2012, 06:21 PM
I can't remember anything, can't tell if this is true or dream...

Habspatrol
11-13-2012, 07:58 PM
My favorite Metallica song.

Aberdeen
11-15-2012, 09:11 AM
This is crazy awesome...

Last week, Google launched ‘Jam with Chrome’, an experimental Web app to play virtual instruments with friends. And now its rolled out 100,000 Stars, that helps you visualize the exact location of stars throughout the Milky Way. With 200 billion stars, there’s a lot to see in our galaxy, and through tapping a myriad of imagery and data from a range of sources, including NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), Google plots the nearest stars to Earth’s Sun.

Story:http://thenextweb.com/google/2012/11/14/100000-stars-googles-latest-chrome-experiment-taps-nasa-to-visually-explore-the-milky-way/

Direct Link: http://workshop.chromeexperiments.com/stars/

Bleedsblue&white
11-15-2012, 07:35 PM
That is great.

Red
11-15-2012, 08:06 PM
That thing about the guy who's in the vegetative state that they figured out how to communicate with is amazing. Occurred in my hometown to boot. Makes me proud. And that's not the only thing they've done that's amazing recently. They announced really good news on the HIV vaccine testing they've been doing a week or two ago as well.

Montana
11-19-2012, 04:44 PM
BaBar Experiment Confirms Time Asymmetry

Time's quantum arrow has a preferred direction, new analysis shows


Menlo Park, Calif. — Time marches relentlessly forward for you and me; watch a movie in reverse, and you'll quickly see something is amiss. But from the point of view of a single, isolated particle, the passage of time looks the same in either direction. For instance, a movie of two particles scattering off of each other would look just as sensible in reverse – a concept known as time reversal symmetry.

Now the BaBar experiment at the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has made the first direct observation of a long-theorized exception to this rule.

Digging through nearly 10 years of data from billions of particle collisions, researchers found that certain particle types change into one another much more often in one way than they do in the other, a violation of time reversal symmetry and confirmation that some subatomic processes have a preferred direction of time.

Reported this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, the results are impressively robust, with a 1 in 10 tredecillion (1043) or 14-sigma level of certainty – far more than needed to declare a discovery.

"It was exciting to design an experimental analysis that enabled us to observe, directly and unambiguously, the asymmetrical nature of time," said BaBar collaborator Fernando Martínez-Vidal, associate professor at the University of Valencia and member of the Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), who led the investigation. "This is a sophisticated analysis, the kind of experimental work that can only be done when an experiment is mature."

http://www.interactions.org/cms/?pid=1032409

worm
11-19-2012, 05:04 PM
so I am going back to the future?

johnunit
11-19-2012, 08:51 PM
Not brand new, but ****ing science


http://youtu.be/SoHeWgLvlXI

SundinsTooth
11-19-2012, 09:00 PM
http://i.imgur.com/UmpOi.gif

PlayerToBeNamedLater
11-21-2012, 11:11 AM
Scientists closer to predicting what time you’ll die


No one can determine with any accuracy specifically when we will die, but a new study has found that a particular gene variation — the same one that seems to determine if you are a morning person or not — is an uncanny predictor of what time of the day you will die.

A group of scientists studying the biological clock made this discovery regarding a specific gene with three different variants of nucleotides — the four basic building blocks of DNA, guanine, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The variants found in this gene were adenine-adenine (A-A), adenine-guanine (A-G) and guanine-guanine (G-G).

"This particular genotype affects the sleep-wake pattern of virtually everyone walking around," said Dr. Clifford Saper, chief of neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, according to Huffington Post. "And it is a fairly profound effect so that the people who have the A-A genotype wake up about an hour earlier than the people who have the G-G genotype, and the A-Gs wake up almost exactly in the middle."

At the same time, the scientists found that of the 1200 older participants in the study, those with the A-A or A-G genotype (36% and 48% of the participants, respectively) tended to die just before 11 a.m., and those with the G-G genotype (16% of the participants) typically died about 7 hours later than that, around 6 p.m.

"So there is really a gene that predicts the time of day that you'll die. Not the date, fortunately, but the time of day," Saper said.

Andrew Lim, the lead author of the study, who works at the Department of Neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center said: "The internal 'biological clock' regulates many aspects of human biology and behaviour. It also influences the timing of acute medical events like stroke and heart attack."

According to the study, published in Annals of Neurology, this discovery could lead to changes in how we schedule shift work, medical treatments and patient monitoring.





http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/geekquinox/scientists-closer-predicting-time-ll-die-202101430.html

zeke
11-21-2012, 09:51 PM
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-10/30/smart-highway-glows-in-the-dark

http://cdni.wired.co.uk/620x413/s_v/Smart%20Highway-dynamic%20paint-Studio%20Roosegaarde.jpg


A smart road design that features glow in the dark tarmac and illuminated weather indicators will be installed in the Netherlands from mid-2013.

"One day I was sitting in my car in the Netherlands, and I was amazed by these roads we spend millions on but no one seems to care what they look like and how they behave," the designer behind the concept, Daan Roosegaarde, told Wired.co.uk. "I started imagining this Route 66 of the future where technology jumps out of the computer screen and becomes part of us."

The Smart Highway by Studio Roosegaarde and infrastructure management group Heijmans won Best Future Concept at the Dutch Design Awards, and has already gone beyond pure concept. The studio has developed a photo-luminising powder that will replace road markings -- it charges up in sunlight, giving it up to ten hours of glow-in-the-dark time come nightfall. "It's like the glow in the dark paint you and I had when we were children," designer Roosegaarde explained, "but we teamed up with a paint manufacture and pushed the development. Now, it's almost radioactive".

Special paint will also be used to paint markers like snowflakes across the road's surface -- when temperatures fall to a certain point, these images will become visible, indicating that the surface will likely be slippery. Roosegaarde says this technology has been around for years, on things like baby food -- the studio has just upscaled it.

The first few hundred metres of glow in the dark, weather-indicating road will be installed in the province of Brabant in mid-2013, followed by priority induction lanes for electric vehicles, interactive lights that switch on as cars pass and wind-powered lights within the next five years.......

JohnnyHolmes
11-21-2012, 10:30 PM
Imagine the party after HIV is cured.

johnunit
11-22-2012, 01:00 PM
Some of that stuff is sucha no-brainer, like having lights rigged to only be on if a car is within sight.

zeke
11-22-2012, 01:03 PM
http://times247.com/articles/scientists-develop-paper-thin-bulletproof-material


http://cdn.times247.com/media/pictures/50a5a06bf2a8bd1317002920/RN_bulletproof.jpg?1353031787

A team of mechanical engineering and materials scientists from Rice University and MIT created special materials that were able to stop bullets in the lab. The group, which included Rice research scientist Jae-Hwang Lee and School of Engineering dean Ned Thomas, recently published their findings in Nature Communications (abstract).

The type of material, called a structured polymer composite, can actually self-assemble into alternating glassy and rubbery layers. When performing ballistic tests on the material at MIT's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, those 20-nanometer-thick layers were able to stop a 9-millimeter bullet and seal the entryway behind it, according to a Rice University article.....

Volcanologist
11-22-2012, 08:55 PM
MIT's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

Just imagine all the awesome shit going on in there. Jays would suffer from priapism.

JaysCyYoung
11-22-2012, 08:56 PM
To take a page from zeke:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MrzGE7PAqLY/T4SNuSs4EJI/AAAAAAAAAHQ/cwfupVGHemk/s1600/Randy_Marsh_covered_in_ectoplasm.jpg

Imagine a world where soldiers would have body armour that was impervious to all types of armour-piercing rounds.

MindzEye
11-22-2012, 09:05 PM
Imagine a world where soldiers would have body armour that was impervious to all types of armour-piercing rounds.

I think that's way more dangerous than you'd be willing to admit. War without casualty is basically giving the political class of powerful countries carte blanche to dominate everyone else.

JaysCyYoung
11-22-2012, 09:08 PM
And that would change the present situation how? :p

Habspatrol
11-22-2012, 09:12 PM
Imagine how bad it would be if "insurgents" got a hold of that shit?

MindzEye
11-22-2012, 09:16 PM
And that would change the present situation how? :p

Would make it worse, is what I'm saying.

Pictures of bloody wounds and coffins was what ended Vietnam. Body counts and cost was what turned the American people against Iraq. The unfortunate fact of the matter is, the people (specifically, of the US) are willing to forget that there's a war going on as long as they don't see the effects of it. As long as it's obliterated brown people, far away from a CNN camera, they don't give a shit. As soon as it's the good'ol boy from Oklahoma who got shot during an ambush of his humvee....then it becomes an issue.

Don't get me wrong...the guys who serve deserve the best protection money can buy, I'm just concerned that all protecting them better would do, is jack up the amount of fighting the political class would be willing to subject them to. There's no magical anti PTSD technology in the pipeline that I'm aware of.

MindzEye
11-22-2012, 09:20 PM
Imagine how bad it would be if "insurgents" got a hold of that shit?

Then of course, there's this. Though it's probably only a matter of time before the U.S implements this stuff, and everyone else gets their hands on it. Which of course will simply spur the creation of more advanced weaponry to counteract it.....

Once upon a time you couldn't put a tank shell through tank armor....because the armor was that advanced...then the guns were made larger...then the armor became thicker...then the guns became high velocity...the the armor became charged ceramic plating (an explosive charge behind the plate disipates the energy of the incoming projectile) ...then the shells became depleted uranium.

So on and so forth.

PlayerToBeNamedLater
11-24-2012, 09:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLn0cSZfl6c

MindzEye
11-24-2012, 11:06 AM
Imagine the party after HIV is cured.

The party before it has been pretty awesome, so I can only imagine.

Red
11-24-2012, 11:54 AM
Imagine a world where soldiers would have body armour that was impervious to all types of armour-piercing rounds.

It would be massively helpful for any soldier, no doubt... although there is a certain point in which it doesn't matter if it pierces the armour or not... the impact of a large enough round would do severe damage to one's body, and probably still kill them even if it doesn't enter the body. It also depends on how rigid the material is. A strong enough round will impact the kevlar, and the kevlar, along with the bullet can still enter the body of a person.

That said, most of the time that a soldier is shot it's not by an extremely large calibre round, and it would certainly be more protective than kevlar. I wonder, if this became the standard material for body armour all over the world, what kind of advancements we would see in weaponry...

SundinsTooth
11-24-2012, 07:06 PM
I wonder if the majority of soldier deaths are even due to gunshot wounds. I would think explosions and concussive forces are more prevalent.

Found a study that shows almost 50% of combat deaths (sample study) were explosives versus 28% for gunshots. Interesting.

MindzEye
11-25-2012, 10:40 PM
http://www.iop.org/news/12/nov/page_58984.html


he printing of 3D tissue has taken a major step forward with the creation of a novel hybrid printer that simplifies the process of creating implantable cartilage.

The printer has been presented today, 22 November, in IOP Publishing’s journal Biofabrication, and was used to create cartilage constructs that could eventually be implanted into injured patients to help re-grow cartilage in specific areas, such as the joints.

The printer is a combination of two low-cost fabrication techniques: a traditional ink jet printer and an electrospinning machine. Combining these systems allowed the scientists to build a structure made from natural and synthetic materials. Synthetic materials ensure the strength of the construct and natural gel materials provide an environment that promotes cell growth.

hockeylover
11-25-2012, 10:52 PM
http://www.iop.org/news/12/nov/page_58984.html

I find it amazing that they can print 3D tissue and print electrodes on tiny test strips for blood glucose testing but it's almost 2013 and the standard, everyday home or office printers continue to be the bane of my existence. Not sure if anyone else shares my printer rage.

http://s3.amazonaws.com/theoatmeal-img/comics/printers/hate_machine.png

da_next_kid
11-26-2012, 05:38 AM
Invest in a laser printer and all your concerns will wither away.

Aberdeen
11-26-2012, 06:03 AM
Agreed 100%, bought a used laser printer in Uni and could never ever go back to shitty ink jets. Laser's are just workhorses, fast, reliable, ink lasts forever. Only thing is they're big.

MindzEye
11-26-2012, 08:12 AM
Yeah, I have to jump onto that bandwagon. If you're not using a laser, you're missing out. You can get into a decent colour laser printer for reasonable money now as well, like 150 bones..

Volcanologist
11-26-2012, 10:32 AM
Dec 3 NASA will be talking about something "for the history books" found by Curiosity on Mars.

MindzEye
11-26-2012, 10:52 AM
Dec 3 NASA will be talking about something "for the history books" found by Curiosity on Mars.

Yeah...I've decided against posting an article about it over the last week because there's nothing in them really other than people at NASA saying that they found something awesome.

Can't ****ing wait.

Artnes
11-26-2012, 10:56 AM
Nibiru actually exists and we're ****ed?

MindzEye
11-26-2012, 10:59 AM
Nibiru actually exists and we're ****ed?

Unless they somehow found it on Mars, I don't think that's it.

Oddly enough though, there's a second Nasa presser on Dec 3 that nobody in the world will give a flying **** about, the Kepler telescope results are being released...so maybe they did find Niburu and are covering it up with drummed up Mars news.

Artnes
11-26-2012, 11:00 AM
This guy beat them to it

http://heavenawaits.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/nibiru1.jpg

SundinsTooth
11-26-2012, 11:46 AM
This guy beat them to it

http://heavenawaits.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/nibiru1.jpg

Wow. If that guy cleaned up his font, he might get published.

MindzEye
11-26-2012, 12:06 PM
I would start with learning that "celestrial" isn't a word.

Volcanologist
11-26-2012, 12:16 PM
couldn't that be lens flare?

voyager
11-26-2012, 01:24 PM
I bet Teeds created that image...

MindzEye
11-26-2012, 02:02 PM
couldn't that be lens flare?

That would be my guess.

Bleedsblue&white
11-26-2012, 05:43 PM
Well the first thing that comes to mind is some kind of proof of life, no matter how small and how old. If not that, water at least.

SundinsTooth
11-26-2012, 06:06 PM
I wonder if it is going to be some type of geological hint at water....say a fluvial deposit of sediments that suggest martian rivers. I imagine proof of life would have slipped out by now...that's pretty dramatic..but NASA is pretty good at keeping secrets (see moon landing hoax). :)

Montana
11-26-2012, 06:11 PM
I'm trying to keep my expectations in check, but it definitely seems like it's going to be something significant. The "for the history books" line is kind of amusing though, given that whatever they found is obviously something new, and thus by default would be something for the history books.

zeke
11-26-2012, 07:02 PM
don't get your hopes up.

hockeylover
11-27-2012, 05:33 PM
Anyone have any interest in microbiology? We isolated a CRE today (Carbapenem Resistant Enterobacteriaceae) today - we don't get see them too often and certainly not at our small hospital. Essentially carbapenems were the type of antibiotics we used as a last resort to treat infections from bacteria that had become resistant to nearly everything else. Now we're seeing bacteria that have developed mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems too. Pretty scary when you think about it.

Bleedsblue&white
11-27-2012, 07:08 PM
That's enough to get one interested.

Volcanologist
11-27-2012, 09:33 PM
You can thank over-prescription of antibiotics for that.

SundinsTooth
11-28-2012, 08:47 AM
Rock Paper Scissors. Ad infinitum.

Bleedsblue&white
11-28-2012, 06:42 PM
"Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em,
And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum."

Every time I see ad infinitum I remember this ditty.

Bleedsblue&white
11-28-2012, 06:42 PM
"And the great fleas themselves, in turn, have greater fleas to go on,
While these again have greater still, and greater still, and so on."

SundinsTooth
11-28-2012, 06:55 PM
http://dobee.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/zeno1.jpg?w=700

Habspatrol
11-28-2012, 10:59 PM
http://dobee.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/zeno1.jpg?w=700

I just looked this up... pretty trippy.

Deckie007
11-28-2012, 11:01 PM
I just looked this up... pretty trippy.


+1

zeke
11-29-2012, 11:53 AM
http://edition.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2012/11/28/rivers-green-petrol-air.cnn

A small British firm says it has found a way to make petrol from air and water, as CNN's Dan Rivers reports